Point Edwards lighting project cuts energy use by more than half

Point Edwards has partnered with Snohomish PUD and the US Department of Energy to replace all common area and street lighting fixtures with new energy-efficient LED's. The project reduces Point Edwards energy footprint by more than half.

Updated to include the correct funding source: the state’s Community Energy Efficiency Program (CEEP).

Story and photos by Larry Vogel

The Point Edwards development has partnered with Snohomish County PUD and the State of Washington in a massive lighting retrofit project projected to cut the complex’s energy use by more than half.

“We’re replacing all our common area lighting with energy-efficient LED (light emitting diode) fixtures,” said Eric Moss, Point Edwards Facilities Manager. Projected to save more than 250,000 kilowatt hours per year, the project saves enough energy to power 22 average homes for a year (according to figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration).

The new garage fixtures include motion sensors, which turn the lights on as motorists approach. This means the lights come on only when needed. In addition to vehicles, the motion sensors also turn the lights on when they detect people moving in the garage, enhancing safety and security.

The new garage fixtures include motion sensors, which turn the lights on as motorists approach. This means the lights come on only when needed.

Josh Dryer of The Light Doctor, contractor for the project, hooks up strips of new LEDs in one of the garage overhead fixtures. "These are wonderful fixtures," he said. "They're brighter, last longer, and provide natural, full-spectrum light that mimics daylight."

Josh Dryer of The Light Doctor, contractor for the project, hooks up strips of new LEDs in one of the garage overhead fixtures. “These are wonderful fixtures,” he said. “They’re brighter, last longer, and provide natural, full-spectrum light that mimics daylight.”

“It’s like having a small generating plant right here in Edmonds,” Moss said.

And the savings go beyond energy conservation. LEDs last much longer than conventional lights. This means fewer change-outs and fewer burned-out fixtures, many of which contain mercury and other hazardous materials, in the waste stream.

“The savings from not having to replace lamps as they burn out is about the same as the avoided electricity costs,” Moss said. “This in effect doubles our savings from the project.”

Most of the project costs are covered by the State of Washington’s Community Energy Efficiency Program (CEEP) administered by Washington State University Energy Extension. Point Edwards picks up about 10 percent of the cost, but the energy savings from the project will pay these off in less than a year.

“We’re really proud that in addition to cutting our own electric bill, we’re helping to postpone the day when a new power generating plant will be needed. A kilowatt hour saved is no different than a kilowatt hour generated, but comes without damming a river, splitting an atom, or burning a single lump of coal,” Moss added.

Pathway lighting is included in the project. Even though they use less energy, the new fixtures are brighter and produce a more natural colored light, thereby enhancing safety for people walking the complex's footpaths.

Pathway lighting is included in the project. Even though they use less energy, the new fixtures are brighter and produce a more natural colored light, thereby enhancing safety for people walking the complex’s footpaths.

 

 

 

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3 Comments

  1. Proud that Point Edwards undertook this enormous energy-saving conversion — and huge thanks to Eric for heading this project!

  2. Great job Eric and crew!!!

  3. Way to go Eric and Point Edwards. It’s great to see such a beautiful community doing its part in preserving the environment.

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