Travels with Charlize, in search of living alone

Dr. David Gross

Dr. David Gross

Part 42: The End, The Beginning

My travels with Charlize will continue. She is, after all, a great travel companion and provider of comfort and attention. My search to discover how to live on my own after so many years of being married is being resolved. During this past year I made a lot of choices, some good, some not so good, all were important to the journey.

I thought having a camping trailer while traveling around the country was a great idea. It was something I thought about from time to time over the years but Rosalie was never interested. We lived in an 8-by-50-foot house trailer when first married and she was not interested in reliving that experience or anything resembling it.

Within a few of weeks of her death I went shopping for the trailer I named Frog. During our first trip it was a fun new experience but reality started to settle in soon after. Driving on the open road pulling Frog was OK but extra concentration was needed when parking, driving in inclement weather, especially high winds or pulling into a crowded gas stations. Finding a nice RV park during was not as straightforward as expected and it took me about half an hour to set up Frog and about the same amount of time to disconnect and get underway again the next morning. It also wasn’t inexpensive, $50 a night for most of the commercial parks. Then there was the task of emptying the “black water tank” — sewage to the uninitiated. The final blow was gas consumption. My truck, Old Blue, essential for pulling the trailer, was averaging about eight or nine miles to the gallon, costing close to or exceeding $4 a gallon.

Old Blue, although a year old when I purchased her, was also a reaction to Rosalie’s death. I was driving a 10-year-old pickup truck while Rosalie drove a year-old van. After her death, every time I got into her van I started to cry. I was already anticipating taking a long road trip with a camping trailer, so I traded the van and the truck for a year-old, high-end, Dodge Ram 1500 four-door crew-cab with four-wheel drive and over-sized wheels. Old Blue was built for tough, manly activities. I was anxious to get out of our house and separate myself and my newly acquired rescued dog Charlize from Rosalie’s memory and palpable presence in the house. I was not yet able to clear out her clothes and other things. I needed to escape all those memories associated with all that physical “stuff” of hers. So there we were, me, Charlize, Old Blue and Frog, off to find, what?

During that first trip, we wandered for almost six weeks and I was not yet unhappy with my choices. The second trip we took seemed to involve added hassles with Frog and the RV lifestyle. I began to think that the cost of RV parks and extra fuel might cover the costs of a lot of hotel rooms. Even with the renovations I made, Frog was not all that comfortable, especially without utility hook-ups. Several times I just left Frog someplace and discovered travel was less complicated, less expensive, more relaxing. Gradually I came to the realization that a travel trailer, or any recreational vehicle, was not the choice for me. It was going to be costly but sometimes one has to admit a mistake, pay the price and get on with life. Frog was sold and gone. It cost me, but what life-lesson doesn’t?

Another reality was in store. I really liked Old Blue, but even when not pulling the trailer gas millage was an issue. On the best of days, on the highway at modest speeds, even with “Eco-Boost” I could only expect 16 or 17 miles per gallon. Then there were the parking garages. After I got her home I discovered Old Blue was five inches too long to fit in my garage. When trying to park in the parking garage at the Harborview Medical Center or at other minimal clearance garages where I found myself, I discovered that had to back up to line up the truck to get around some close corners and into a parking spot without clipping a post or a big car parked in a compact spot.

The deciding factor was discovered during my preparation for ankle surgery. With the specter of 12 weeks of recovery and not being allowed to bear weight on my left leg, I practiced getting in and out of the truck using just my right foot. I found it all but impossible, Old Blue was just too high off the ground.

So Charlize and I went car shopping. We found a new crossover SUV that was easy for me to get in and out of using just one foot. The salespeople probably thought they we dealing with just another weird old man when they observed my strange behavior testing this ability. The new vehicle, actually a computer with four wheels, gets excellent gas millage, has enough room for Charlize and everything we might need for road trips. It’s also easier to keep clean. Was trading Old Blue for the new car another poor choice, made too quickly? I don’t know yet, but I’m glad I’m not struggling to get in and out of Old Blue on one foot, or stuck in the house because I can’t. The new car also fits into my garage, along with a lot of fishing gear.

So—the journey continues, life’s journey that is. Steinbeck traveled with his dog, Charley, searching to define the America of that time. My Charlize and I will continue our travels but my search to find out how to live without Rosalie is resolving. I still miss her every day but am becoming more accustomed to making my own decisions and finding something interesting and worthwhile to accomplish each day. I am more comfortable with the philosophy that each person’s life is a journey. Inevitably we end the journey alone and along the way have to learn to deal with the loss of loved ones. Both Rosalie and I lost our parents’ years ago and we came to accept that as a normal part of the journey. Losing Rosalie was much more difficult but also part of the same journey. Losing a child would be devastating, but many others have coped with even that, I pray I never have to.

Charlize, I realize, has an easier life to deal with. She lives only in the moment. She obviously has memories of some sort of abuse but they only intrude when something happening in the present brings back those memories, for example when I correct some behavior I don’t think appropriate. I wouldn’t ever think of hitting her but someone has, based on the way she responds when I raise my voice.

Publisher’s note: After his losing his wife of 52 years to cancer, Dr. David Gross has embarked on an extended road trip with his new dog, Charlize, and is writing about his experiences.

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2 Comments

  1. Dear Writing Buddy~ again and again I marvel at your journey~ and feel so privileged to be welcomed to tag along via your “Travels with Charlize.”

  2. Dave: Good to see you in print again. I know you will continue to write with the many stories in your mind, some of which we shared. It was recommended to me to write a letter to my departed wife – I did and what a reaction of letting go and saying goodbye it created. It will be fun to introduce Charlize and Sauci (my Yorkie) who is also great company and comfort. More stories to share on Sunday evenings. See you there at the Louvre for Story Time.
    Bill Morton

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