Travels with Charlize, in search of living alone

Dr. David Gross

Dr. David Gross

Part 51: Heading Home

While visiting with my brother and his family in the desert near Cave Creek, Arizona For a couple of weeks Charlize and I reveled in sun, warm temperatures and one “gully washer” consisting of heavy rain and hail. Then we made the now easy drive to Carlsbad, California for a visit with my son and his family. More sun and warm temperatures and Charlize and her pal Bentley were given the opportunity to play in the surf at the dog beach of Delmar.

Charlize focused on the ball, Bentley not so much.

Charlize focused on the ball, Bentley not so much.

 

The subdivision where my son’s house is located is full of homes with owners who care about and spend time and/or money on their front yards. While walking Charlize one morning I snapped this photo of a succulent garden next to the sidewalk. It mimics a choral reef doesn’t it? Enough to make a man and his dog smile.

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Succulent garden in a Carlsbad, Calif. subdivision.

After a short week visiting with my granddaughters and their parents, Charlize and I — gone from home for almost a month — were ready to get back on the road. I planned ahead, delaying our departure until late enough in the morning to hit the LA traffic between ten and eleven in the morning. My logical reasoning was that timing our trip in this manner would allow us to hit the LA traffic at a less crowded time. Wrong! We were stymied by heavy traffic, moving at an average of about ten miles per hour until the five lanes of freeway eventually became a parking lot.

Almost an hour later we finally cleared the accident. The site was crowded with two fire trucks, two police cruisers and three wrecked automobiles occupying three lanes. We made it to Paso Robles early enough to spot a Charlize-friendly La Quinta and check in. That evening the hotel hosted a free wine and cheese tasting with some outstanding Zinfandels that the area full of wineries is known for. Nice!

At the end of the next day we stopped at another of those ’50s motels this one in Trinity, California. A beautiful place close to Trinity Lake and on the Trinity River, an area made famous by the gold rush.

The '50s motel in Trinity, California where Charlize and I stayed.

The ’50s motel in Trinity, California where Charlize and I stayed.

The next day we were off early after a stop at a local coffee shop next door to the motel, the real reason that motel was chosen. Their doughnuts and sweet rolls were all made on site, fresh, warm and too delicious for my waistline. The coffee was good too. We left the town shrouded in mist and worked our way to the top of the pass where Charlize discovered fascinating scents that occupied her attention until I finally lost patience. That’s the Trinity River flowing through the memorable landscape.

Charlize found something of abiding interest to her nose along the Trinity River.

Charlize found something of abiding interest to her nose along the Trinity River.

We worked our way back to the 101 and the Oregon coast, stopping often to just absorb the endlessly changing scenes of rocks, water, mist, waves, wildlife, and peace. Good for the soul. We stopped that afternoon in the little town of Yachats, Oregon north of Coos Bay and south of Newport. There are an amazing number of beach homes between the highway and the sea and numerous small towns to serve the transitory occupants. It is amazingly beautiful but I’m not convinced I would enjoy living that close to neighbors. I didn’t bother to inquire about the cost of that real estate.

The hotel/resort we found in Yachats was right on the cliff next to the ocean, very nice, welcomed Charlize and wasn’t that much more expensive than the motel in Trinity. It was a bargain and even had a good restaurant. My room faced the ocean with a great view and Charlize and I were able to take a long walk along the cliffs that evening. The sign reads; “unstable cliffs, stay back”. Charlize only weighs seventy-five pounds and was quite interested it whatever was happening over the edge. I stayed well away.

Charlize still hasn’t learned to read the signs.

Charlize still hasn’t learned to read the signs.

The next morning we continued north along the coast where we encountered more breathtaking scenery but, again, many small towns. Once clear of the towns we frequently encountered people driving thirty miles per hour in fifty-five mile per hour zones, taking in the views. We had been gone from home for nearly five weeks and I was getting anxious to sleep in my own bed. North of Lincoln City I spotted state highway 18 angling north and east to Portland. We drove through some interesting rolling hills and farm country, through some Portland suburbs and hooked up with I-5. The traffic was heavy, requiring hard concentration. I’m not a fan of freeway driving, much preferring the back roads, but I pulled into my driveway before 4 that afternoon. Home again and glad to have arrived safely!

– By Dr. David Gross

After his losing his wife of 52 years to cancer, Dr. David Gross has embarked on an extended road trip with his new dog, Charlize, and is writing about his experiences.

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2 Comments

  1. Dr. Gross, I am really enjoying your column and travels. I moved to the Pacific Northwest six years ago, just me and my dog Polly in my big old Dodge Magnum, driving cross-country from my longtime home of Minneapolis, Minnesota. I came to live in Edmonds while attending doctoral school in psychology, and I have made Edmonds my home. Polly went to Dog Heaven last summer. I am so happy that you have Charlize at your side! Great writing and observations about life. Thank you for your column.

  2. Thanks for your kind comments Sabrina. Charlize and I have finished our travels for now and I’m working on turning our odyssey into a new book. I hope to start a new column shortly.

    Dave

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