Reminder: City’s plan to address climate change in Edmonds to be revisited Wednesday

Strom Peterson

Strom Peterson

Much has been written about climate change at the national and international level. This Wednesday, April 30 from 6-9 p.m., local citizens’ group Sustainable Edmonds will focus on what’s happening right here in Edmonds. And if you can’t make it in person, My Edmonds News will be streaming it live here. You can even submit questions via email for the panelists to answer both before or during the event by emailing teresa@myedmondsnews.com.

The presentation, “Climate Change in Edmonds: Reviewing our 2010 Edmonds Climate Action Plan Four Years Later,” will be at the Edmonds Senior Center, 220 Railroad Ave. It’s a followup to a 17-page “Climate Action Plan” issued in February 2010 by the Edmonds Citizens Committee on the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement.

The plan called on the Edmonds community to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through adjustments in transportation and land use, lifestyle, buildings, local environment and local economy. The presentation will include a look at where we are with greenhouse gas reductions in Edmonds, four years later.

Keynote speakers are Richard Gammon, professor emeritus of chemistry and oceanography, and adjunct professor emeritus of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington, and attorney T.C. Richmond, vice chair of the National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee.

Joan Bloom

Joan Bloom

Other expert panelists include Edmonds City Councilmembers Strom Peterson and Joan Bloom, State Sen. Marko Liias, Pete Mills from the office of Congressman Jim McDermott and local sustainability activists Todd Cloutier and Tara Anderson.

Audience participation is encouraged and the discussion will be moderated by Linda Lyshall, a former Edmonds resident who current serves as district manager at the San Juan Islands Conservation District, where she leads the newly formed Islands Energy program, which promotes energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Gammon was a co-author of the first Scientific Assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 1990. As chief of the carbon dioxide program, he directed the U.S. program to globally monitor the atmospheric concentration of CO2. His research has emphasized the measurement and interpretation of atmospheric trace gases critical to climate change. He lives in Seattle.

Richmond, of Edmonds, is vice-chair of the committee charged to advise and assist in the preparation of the National Climate Assessment, which analyzes the latest science and information about the current and projected effects of climate variability and change across the U.S. She is a lawyer in the Seattle office of Van Ness Fedman LLP, where her practice focuses on environmental law, land use, water law and climate change.

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1 Comment

  1. Please come and join us. The public is welcome to join us and to ask questions.

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