This Month in Edmonds History: Museum receives significant donation

George Brackett’s parlor furniture, to be seen in upcoming exhibit at the newly remodeled Edmonds Historical Museum.

George Brackett’s parlor furniture, to be seen in upcoming exhibit at the newly remodeled Edmonds Historical Museum.

My Edmonds News is proud to present a monthly look at Edmonds history, straight from the archives of the Edmonds Historical Museum. For the month of April, we’ll revisit the days of Edmonds’ founding.

In its 40-year history, the Edmonds-South Snohomish County Historical and Society and Museum has collected thousands of historic artifacts, documents and photographs. Together, these items tell the story of the area’s settlement, growth, and progress. They provide context to the stories and memories of generations past, and stitch together the ongoing narrative we contribute to today.

In the past month, while undergoing renovations, the museum received a significant donation that adds to this story. Early parlor furniture belonging to Edmonds settler George Brackett was donated by the Milholland family, descendants of Brackett. The set consists of one settee, two arm chairs, and two straight-backed chairs, all hand-carved and well-preserved. Brackett’s home was located at what is now the corner of 2nd Avenue North and Edmonds Street.

George Brackett family in front of residence, c. 1890, Location of what is corner of 2nd Ave N & Edmonds Street.  L to R: Nellie, Ronald, Fannie, George Jr., Etta & George Brackett, unknown.

George Brackett family in front of residence, c. 1890, Location of what is corner of 2nd Ave N & Edmonds Street. L to R: Nellie, Ronald, Fannie, George Jr., Etta & George Brackett, unknown.

The parlor was a very symbolic room in early homes, displaying the wealth and status of the home’s occupants. It was also a recreational room, and family members gathered there for conversation, music and games. In the late 1800s, when Brackett arrived in Edmonds, the standard parlor would have typically consisted of a sofa, one or two gentleman’s chairs, one or two ladies’ chairs, and additional straight-backed chairs for guests. The men’s chairs most often had arms, while the ladies’ chairs did not. Men’s chairs were often larger, too, representing the hierarchy of the family.

The donated Brackett parlor furniture will be on display during the museum’s upcoming exhibit, Open for Business, which runs May 3 through Oct. 4.

The museum accepts donations of artifacts, photographs and documents related to the history of Edmonds and South Snohomish County as part of their ongoing mission. If you have items to donate, please contact the museum today!

If you like what you are reading, please consider a weekly, monthly or one-time voluntary donation of any amount to support our work. You can donate via this link.

Leave a Reply