County officials present Edmonds Senior Center Board with resolution endorsing construction of new facility; conceptual drawings unveiled

County Council President Stephanie Wright and County Executive John Lovick present Edmonds Senior Center Executive Director Farrell Fleming with a copy of the Joint Resolution 14-011 commending the Edmonds Senior Center and endorsing the construction of a new center.

County Council President Stephanie Wright and County Executive John Lovick present Edmonds Senior Center Executive Director Farrell Fleming with a copy of the Joint Resolution 14-011 commending the Edmonds Senior Center and endorsing the construction of a new center. (Photo by Larry Vogel)

Snohomish County Executive John Lovick and County Council President Stephanie Wright dropped in on Wednesday’s Edmonds Senior Center Board meeting with a special treat: a joint resolution from the County Executive and Council commending the Senior Center for its service to the community and endorsing the plan to build a new center.

Citing the strong role of the Senior Center in the Edmonds community since its formation in 1968, the unfailing dedication of its staff and its recognition as a national leader and innovator in developing programs and services to meet the needs of older adults, the resolution formalizes the county’s strong support for “demolition of the current Edmonds Senior Center facility and the reconstruction of the new Edmonds Senior Center at its current location.”

In their remarks, Lovick and Wright praised center staff, Executive Director Farrell Fleming, and the board for their continuing efforts to make the Edmonds Senior Center a model for similar facilities in the region and nationwide.

“Edmonds is fortunate to have this facility to call its own,” said Lovick. “And we look forward to carrying on the tradition of excellence begun here in a new facility that will be both a senior center and a focal point for the community.”

On display were two working concepts for the new facility, one developed by The Environmental Works Community Design Center, the other by Zervas Architects of Bellingham. (Photos of the conceptual drawings on display below.)

“It’s important to note that these do not represent anywhere near the final design,” said Fleming. “But it’s a great start, and gives a snapshot of the designers’ initial ideas. There’s much more work to do.”

– Story by Larry Vogel

Artist's rendering of the new senior center preliminary concept presented by The Environmental Works. This view is looking south at the northeast corner of the building, across the parking area.

Artist’s rendering of the new senior center preliminary concept presented by The Environmental Works. This view is looking south at the northeast corner of the building, across the parking area.

Conceptual view of The Environmental Works preliminary design as seen from the west (Puget Sound side).

Conceptual view of The Environmental Works preliminary design as seen from the west (Puget Sound side).

The preliminary concept from Zervas looking south at the northeast corner of the building.

The preliminary concept from Zervas looking south at the northeast corner of the building.

Zervas's concept as seen looking southeast from the northwest corner (Puget Sound side).

The Zervas concept as seen looking southeast from the northwest corner (Puget Sound side).

 

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11 Comments

  1. Yeah! Great news. At first blush, Then Environmental Works sketch is more pleasing to my eye…especially in our long, dark months.

  2. Nice design by the same architect we used on the Lynnwood Convention Center. It is not clear if the design includes a view corridor to Puget Sound from the walkway and street. Some cities have a code that requires 25% of the frontage be set aside for a view corridor to a lake or Sound. They can use this 25% for parking and low landscaping, but not a view blocking two story building. Not sure if our code covers this, but it would be more polite development with this consideration.

  3. I also hope a view corridor is in the plans. I also wonder if the Senior Center is required to be used only for a certain age group. I have lived in an area where the Senior Center was also a community center and encouraged other age groups to use the facility.
    Does anyone know the legal requirements?

    • yeah, Barbara!

      i’m all for it!

      one of the major problems with this society is all the forms of segregation! we ALL have much to gain from integration – age, as well as beliefs!

      • I believe all ages benefit from interaction with each other. It helps do away with fear of different age groups.

  4. The view corridor requirement of the Edmonds City code is at least 30% contiguous. Both of the designs meet or exceed this requirement. This was one of many design parameters we gave to the architects.
    The concept that we have been working with from the beginning is that the new building will function both as a senior center and as a community center. Generally the 8:00am-4::00 weekday period will be senior activities and the 4:00-10:00 weekday evening slot will be community activities. There will always be exceptions to this, but this will be the norm. The weekends will be largely community activities along with a full facility rental program. Inter-generational events and programs will occur at all times, as they do now.
    Mayor Dave Earling recently suggested that all of our visual materials should indicate this broader community focus. We are taking his advice, so going forward the project will be described as the Edmonds Senior and Community Center. This is not the name of the new Center, but a working description. The Senior Center Board of Directors strongly supports the new building being an asset for the WHOLE community.

    • I have been involved with events which are not limited to seniors, but I don’t think the public is aware of it. I think using the name Edmonds Senior and Community Center will help change the perception. I am glad to read this description of the center.

  5. Wow!

  6. As a long time resident of Edmonds, I think the initial plans and intent are great – I think we all can agree the existing building is not in very good shape.

    However, in today’s world it’s important to understand how a project like this is being funded – has this pan been shared yet?

  7. Will the new center achieve LEED gold or platinum levels? LEED, or Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design, is a green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. A Senior Center and Community Center of modern design and construction on our waterfront will be a fine addition to our city. See the Bullitt Center in Seattle for some ideas about design features.

  8. speaking/writing re: the enivironment…

    who do we speak with – to have a green, growing roof?

    REAL plant and small animal life, literally as the roof?

    i believe it was back in the last century… the seattle public library system built the ballard library with a roof, full of life – they have a periscope to allow people to actually look at it

    so – who do we speak with?

    any support here???

    thanx!

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