Reminder: Free water saver kits available at City of Edmonds Public Works

hoseThe City of Edmonds Public Works Department is providing a limited number of free water-saver kits to its water customers. There are two types of water-saver kits available on a first-come-first-served basis, while supplies last.

The indoor kit includes:

¨    One reduced-flow showerhead (rated at 2.0 gallons per minute maximum) which features an adjustable spray.

¨    Two fixed faucet aerators (each rated at 1.0 gallon per minute) for bathroom or utility sinks.

¨    One small roll of Teflon tape.

The outdoor kit includes:

¨    One heavy-duty garden hose nozzle featuring seven different types of sprays.

¨    Two garden hose repair ends and hose washers.

Also at this time there is a limited supply of free automatic shut-off watering timer devices – for use with lawn sprinklers or drip irrigation hoses.

While supplies last, City of Edmonds water customers can pick up their free kits at the main reception counter at the Edmonds Public Works office, 7110 210th St. S.W., during the business hours of 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The office is closed on Fourth of July.

 

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2 Comments

  1. Just remember folks, the more we conserve, the fewer profits for the company and a perfect excuse to raise the prices since they can’t make it on the income they’re currently receiving. I’ve seen this routine elsewhere in my lengthy lifetime.

  2. William–a slightly different perspective for you to consider: The population in the Puget Sound region continues to grow. One thing that conservation by the rest of us does is it leaves some of our finite natural resources (such as domestic water) for the incoming population. Maybe we’d like to shut the door and not let anyone else in, but that’s just not realistic, the population will continue to increase. Since the majority of our domestic water supply comes from snowmelt, which is very likely to be in shorter supply in the future due to global warming, this conservation effort is a great benefit to us all (financially and otherwise) because it means the government won’t have to work so hard to provide domestic water to us all–for example, drilling new wells. If you’re fearing price increases, wait til you see the bill for a few new drinking water wells. Just a thought…

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