Tarin Erickson leaving her position as Edmonds Museum director

Edmonds Historical Museum director Tarin Erickson at the museum's main desk in the newly renovated upper level.  Ever since she was hired three and half years ago, Erickson has dreamed about restoring this architectural gem to its original glory.  It took years of planning, fundraising and lots of plain hard work, but thanks to her efforts the renovation was completed earlier this year. "I'll always think of this as my biggest accomplishment," she said. (Photo courtesy Edmonds Historical Museum)

Edmonds Historical Museum director Tarin Erickson at the museum’s main desk in the newly renovated upper level. Ever since she was hired three and half years ago, Erickson has dreamed about restoring this architectural gem to its original glory. It took years of planning, fundraising and lots of plain hard work, but thanks to her efforts the renovation was completed earlier this year. “I’ll always think of this as my biggest accomplishment,” she said. (Photo courtesy Edmonds Historical Museum)

After three and half years on the job, Tarin Erickson, director of the Edmonds Historical Museum, has announced her resignation. She will be transitioning to a position in Seattle, where she will continue her career in museum and collections management with the U.S. National Park Service.

“It’s been such a pleasure to work in Edmonds as museum director,” she said. “The city, the community, and the museum board have all been wonderful. I will sincerely miss the town and the people.”

Under her tenure the museum’s influence and visibility have grown, allowing it to better meet its mission to preserve the history of Edmonds.

In addition, Erickson leaves a lasting legacy to the Edmonds community of more than 20 exhibits she designed and planned. Her personal favorite was the ‘Stick ‘Em Up’ exhibit celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Edmonds Police Department.

“It was so exciting to work hand-in-hand with the police department, merge their artifacts with our own, and come up with a top-notch exhibit,” she said. “And it wasn’t just the police—other groups and several private citizens participated and shared their mementos and remembrances. It was a real community effort.”

But to Erickson, her flagship accomplishment is the recently completed renovation of the museum’s upper level in Edmonds’ historic 1910 Carnegie Library.

“I always imagined how beautiful this building looked when it first opened,” she said. “It’s been my dream to see this architectural gem restored for the enjoyment of the Edmonds community and our museum’s visitors, now and in the future.”

Erickson spearheaded the renovation effort, choosing building materials, colors, and personally wielding hammers and paintbrushes along with the other volunteers who donated time to make this a reality. The work was completed earlier this year

“I picked up a lot of splinters doing this,” she said with a laugh.

Bill Lambert is president of the Edmonds-South Snohomish County Historical Society Board, which governs the museum.

“The museum has been blessed by Tarin’s years of service and leadership, and we are genuinely saddened by her departure,” he said. “But we understand that it is time for her to move on to another career enhancing position. Much has been accomplished during her tenure, and I’m very pleased to report that she has generously offered to help with the transition to a new director and with other projects from time to time.”

According to Lambert, the Board will immediately begin a search for a new director, and in the interim Collections Manager Caitlin Kelly, who has been with the museum for more than five years, will keep things running. “Caitlin has a strong background in managing artifacts and collections, and I’m confident that her experience and expertise will make for a seamless transition,” he said.

“We have many activities to keep on track,” Lambert added. “In addition to keeping up our displays and exhibits and managing our collections, the Museum operates the Edmonds Summer Market, the fall Scarecrow Festival and the annual Heritage Days banquet and fundraiser. While we conduct the search for a new director, we welcome ideas and suggestions on how the museum can better serve the Edmonds community.”

A farewell reception for Tarin will be held at 3 p.m. on Thursday, August 7, at the museum. It is open to the public.

The museum is open year-round between 1 and 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, but opens at 10 a.m. on summer market days. Suggested donation in lieu of an admission fee is $5 for adults, and $2 for students.

Learn more at the museum’s website.

 

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4 Comments

  1. Congratulations to Tarin. She will be greatly missed here Edmonds. Her legacy includes the restoration of the 1910 Carnegie library; a stream of marvelous, fresh exhibits,; and much improved accessibility of resources to the public. When I will remember most however is her humor and openness to volunteers, staff, and visitors.

  2. Tarin, we are sorry to have you leave but understand the great opportunity for you. I have seen the many exhibits and the recent remodel. They have added so much to the community. I am sure Caitlin will do a good job in the transition.

  3. Tarin, many thanks for improving the Museum, its displays and making a difference. Best wishes in the new work.

  4. Tarin has been a wonderful addition for our Museum and we will miss her a great deal. She brought a fresh approach to the Museum and with her many talents gave us a lot of new ideas to consider.

    Her new co-workers are very lucky and are going to enjoy working with her. Best wishes to you Tarin! We will miss you in many ways.

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