Local knitters weave warmth for local foster and at-risk kids

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 The needles fly as group members turn skeins of yarn into hats sized to fit kids from newborn to 12 years. The hats are distributed by Providence Hospital to foster and at-risk kids in Snohomish County.
The needles fly as group members turn skeins of yarn into hats sized to fit kids from newborn to 12 years.

On Tuesday mornings, visitors to the Edmonds Library can hardly help noticing the laughter and loud conversation spilling from the main floor conference room.  But peek through the glass to see what the ruckus is about, and you’ll see a large table piled high with yarn, surrounded by an army of smiling knitters busily turning it into dozens of small hats.

tn_DSC_0908It’s all part of the latest service project of the Knitting and Crocheting Circle of the Edmonds Library (KCCEL), a group of some 25 “needle jockeys” who get together weekly to share patterns, crafty tricks and shortcuts, and — lately — the satisfaction of helping some very special kids.

In addition to working on personal projects, for the past three years the group has been knitting caps for at-risk and foster kids in Snohomish County. The caps are distributed through Providence Hospital.

“Over the past few weeks we’ve made 56 hats and counting, in sizes for newborns up to 12 years old,” said Marian Smith, KCCEL founder unofficial group den mother.  “We do this twice a year, now and during the winter holiday season.”

Group members stand in front of some of the hats about to be donated to help foster and at-risk kids. L to R Judy Glaza, Lauren Heerschap, Marian Smith, Cindy Francis, Janice Carr and Catherine Alexander.
Group members stand in front of some of the hats about to be donated to help foster and at-risk kids. L to R Judy Glaza, Marian Smith, Lauren Heerschap, Cindy Francis, Janice Carr and Catherine Alexander.

Smith urges anyone with an interest in knitting and/or crocheting to drop by the Edmonds Library Tuesday mornings between 10:30 a.m. and noon and join in. “If you don’t know how to knit, we’ll teach you,” she said.  “The local fabric and craft store charges $30 for a knitting class, but here you can learn for free. And on top of that, you get the satisfaction of being part of a fun, cohesive group that’s working to make life a little warmer for kids in need.”

— Story and photos by Larry Vogel

2 COMMENTS

  1. You gals should take a field trip over to the Boys and Girls club and teach the kids how to knit. I have donated lots of yarn and needles to them in the past, but don’t know if they actually know how to knit!

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