Scene in Edmonds: Celebrating raptors at Bird Fest

600
4

Approximately 50 people attended the Sarvey Wildlife Raptors presentation during Puget Sound Bird Fest at the Frances Anderson Center Saturday. David Carlos was there to take photos:

DSC00242
Kestrel SkyHawk, right, from the Sarvey Wildlife Care Center shows how the barn owl being held by a staff member can hear. Barn owls live 2 years in the wild, and up to 11 years in captivity.
DSC00265
Here’s a great horned owl. Its ear tufts may indicate its mood. If the ear tufts are pointing up, it’s satisfied or happy. These owls can also turn their heads 270 degrees. Their necks are as thick as a man’s thumb; feathers make the neck seem bigger.
A staff member holds a peregrine falcon. These falcons can dive 200 miles per hour. They also have a kean sense of vision, seeing prey a mile away. In captivity, they can live up to 25 years; in the wild they live up to 15 years.
A staff member holds a peregrine falcon. These falcons can dive 200 miles per hour. They also have a kean sense of vision, seeing prey a mile away. In captivity, they can live up to 25 years; in the wild they live up to 15 years.
DSC00346
Next came a turkey vulture. These birds are scavengers, eating dead animals such as road kill. Gross fact: They defend themselves from predators by regurgitating at them. They also cool themselves off by urinating on their legs (the liquid evaporates and cools them down).
This is a golden eagle, usually seen east of the Cascade Mountains. This particular eagle is 15 years old, weighs 12 pounds, and has a wing span of 6 feet, 1 inch.
This is a golden eagle, usually seen east of the Cascade Mountains. This particular eagle is 15 years old, weighs 12 pounds, and has a wing span of 6 feet, 1 inch.
Here's an American bald eagle. They get their name from the old English word, "Balde," which meant "white-headed." If bald eagles can read, they can read a newspaper three football fields away.
Here’s an American bald eagle. They get their name from the old English word, “Balde,” which meant “white-headed.” If bald eagles can read, they can read a newspaper three football fields away.

4 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks for the great photos and information. Raptors are fascinating. Turkey vultures, Yuk! But they provide a necessary service , cleaning up roads, forests etc.

  2. What a thrill it was to see these beautiful, wild animals up close and hear their stories. The staff from Sarvey was quite knowledgeable and made a special effort to involve the very young and very excited young children.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here