Dog attack by coyote a reminder to keep your pets safe

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(Photo by Ty Smedes, courtesy of Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife)

We just received word of a coyote attack on a dog in Edmonds’ Pine Ridge Park neighborhood, so wanted to remind readers that it’s dangerous to leave cats and small dogs unattended.

And here’s a link to helpful information about coyotes from the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife.

 

22 Replies to “Dog attack by coyote a reminder to keep your pets safe”

  1. How very sad. Afte seeing a coyote in our back yard a couple of months ago, we now walk our dog out on a leash, even though our yard is fenced. If you can’t do that, there is a product called a coyote vest. Find it at http://www.coyotevest.com.




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  2. How do I sign up for one in Firdale? We have at least four cats that prowl the neighborhood. They love stocking birds in our backyard and driving the dogs crazy. At least one of them is in heat right now. There’s nothing like a cat in heat to get serenaded by.




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      1. Jeff wants a coyote by his house, Melissa – to get the pets there. Lolz.

        Dogs are horrible for the environment. They eat 30% of the nation’s meat and poop is at least 4% of our landfill mass. The impact of a small dog on the environment is measured as 1 or 2 SUV’s depending on which ecologist you ask. Cats decimate base animal species. I love it when nature reminds of these things in her own way. I do love dogs and don’t want loved ones hurt, but Edmonds is not sustainable. We might be on a Tree City USA list and have some ridiculous solar panels on a public building even though solar don’t work here (kudos City Council), but I also see a boom in puppies around here which sorta undoes whatever environmental goals we laud ourselves for, and then some.




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  3. There’s also raccoons out there. I see them often and they are a danger as well. I’m sorry to hear about the dog.




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  4. Matthew,
    I respectfully disagree with you about the effectiveness of solar power in the Northwest. You are correct that southerly parts of the country receive more average sunlight per day and that solar power is more effective there. However, Germany, which is at roughly the same latitude as ours and has a climate very similar to the Puget Sound region, has one of the greatest concentrations of solar panels per capita in the world. They have done the math and have determined solar power makes sense there.




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    1. A bit further north lies Denmark – less sun perhaps. In 2014 wind energy produced 42.7 percent their electricity. Biofuels (wood, straw and biogas) and the biodegradable part of waste provided the next largest source at 12.7%. We lag far, far behind.

      Following Denmark is even colder/darker Sweden. It now leads in renewable energy, followed by Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Scotland, Germany and Uruguay. The US is way down the list. I guess we lack the technology and can’t afford it…




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      1. Nathaniel, is your house solar? Nothing other than economic reality is preventing any individual from adopting solar on their own. The tech is already there. The question is simply, how much do you want to pay to feel as though you’re one with nature even though there’s nothing natural about any modern convienience we take for granted?




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      2. OooNathaniel, Scandinavia, in general, exports *huge* amounts of fossil fuels. They are leaders in pumping and natural gas production. Norway, for example, pumps more oil per capita than Saudi Arabia and is second to only Russia in natural gas production. If we were them, we’d nationalize our oil, drill baby drill Alaska and anywhere else we could stick a pipe in the ground, sell it to the global market place and use the money to buy solar panels and windmills. That doesn’t make a lot of sense, but that’s Denmark.




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        1. I definitely think we have gone way off topic on this discussion — the story was about keeping your dog safe from coyotes.
          Teresa




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      3. @MEN, no one debated the merits of the environment when I made similar points in the Taming Bigfoot thread, so I’m elated. We’re very connected to our pets, not so connected to the environment. Twice I’ve seen coyotes on the on-ramp to I-5. It’s a poetic cause-effect, we cultivate cattle and farm land for the meat our dogs eat, which displaces coyote, coyote eats dog.




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    2. A panel from PUD gave the City Council a briefing about six months ago and the consensus was that solar in this area was not viable and not cost effective. Germans can barely afford their power bills and it will get worse for them. If “doing the math” means have us pay *quadruple* the costs for energy, then I suppose it could be said that it works on paper. By empirical analysis, Germany imports a tremendous amount of fossil fuel energy. They had a plan, but they’ve met none of their goals. It was pretty boneheaded of them to leave nuclear energy and upset the whole apple cart.

      We benefit from having hydroelectric power. Politically speaking, it would be almost impossible to flood a river to build another damn; the EPA and the tribes would stop it. Clean Coal is essential, as Germany proves, Nuclear is underrepresented in our energy composition scheme. We need more hydro electric, and more Nuclear Reactors, perhaps Molten-Salt Reactors.

      Dogs anyone? Will the Governor’s Carbon Tax he wants as a detente for funding K-12 Education be levied against our comfort animals, or will it be levied against our means of getting back and forth to our jobs and livelihood?




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  5. Someone is pulling the public’s leg. I lived off grid deap in the forest for many years. I have watched coyotes and coyote pacts, and domestic dogs and pacts of wild domestic dogs interacting in the wilderness. Coyotes do not attack dogs. As a matter of fact, coyotes howl constantly as they move from spot to spot, letting ever creature in the forest know where they are moving.
    Domestic dogs and packs of wild domestic dogs move silently through the forest. Domestic dogs will not hesitate to attack coyotes. They attack silently and ferociously. Coyotes will fight to defend themselves when attacked by a domestic dog(s).
    Any dog injured by a coyote was the initiator of the conflict
    between the two species which led to the dog being injured. Coyotes eat small game and carrion, not dogs. Cats will could become a meal for a coyote, however the cat would need to be small and weak.
    Humans fear nature and nature’s wild creatures because of what they have been taught, rather than what they have actually experienced. It’s the humans and their domestic dogs and cats that are way more dangerous to nature’s creatures, and themselves for that matter, than are the wild animals of the forest.
    I would suggest that the humans keep their domestic animals secured from running freely in the wilderness so that their domestic dogs don’t attack the coyotes, fox, wolfs, bears, wildcats and other forest creatures that will fight back if attacked.




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  6. A outdoor cat is NOT a pet any more then a chicken or a rabbit. The only difference is the neighbors don’t have to put up with chickens and rabbits getting into their yard.

    F.Y.I. here are a couple of links showing how destructive the domestic house cat is:
    http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-21236690
    “global extinction of 33 species.”
    “Our study suggests that they are the top threat to US wildlife.”

    https://abcbirds.org/article/outdoor-cats-single-greatest-source-of-human-caused-mortality-for-birds-and-mammals-says-new-study/
    “The study’s estimate of bird mortality far exceeds any previously estimated U.S. figure for cats. In fact, this magnitude of mortality may exceed all other direct sources of anthropogenic bird and mammal mortality combined.”




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  7. It is my dog Oliver that was attacked. He was by my open kitchen door. It was mid morning daylight. His name is Oliver. He had emergency surgery. He is going to live. I’m getting a fence. No unsupervised pets or children again even for a second.




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    1. Bridget, I am so very sorry that Oliver was attacked by a coyote. Please be aware, a “fence” will not keep a coyote (or raccoons) out, they are masters of invasion and have sustained their existence for for many centuries, i.e., wiley coyote. We live on the “berm”, and we see coyotes pass several times a week just 20 to 30 ft from my patio. I have two bichon’s (dogs) and the coyotes come and smell where they have been. I never, never let them out without a very short leash with my presence by their side, always looking for a surprise attack. Again, so happy that Oliver will recover.




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      1. I will do the same with Oliver in future. But I’m worried about my younger grandkids if they are playing in my yard. I don’t plan on letting them play in my yard without an adult there, but I was hoping a tall fence might deter a sneak attack on a little kid in the sandbox etc. Right now, I’m upset and not sure what to do.




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  8. I was honestly shocked by the mean spirited tone and lack of compassion in some of these comments. A pet is an important family member. The last thing the family needs after this trauma is a bunch of lectures and judgement. If you can’t say something kind, keep it to yourself, people!




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    1. Pets are animals, not people. The news is full of lectures about the environment. Nature is taking matters into her own hands , and it’s not mean spirited. Coyotes are hungry due to cats killing off their natural prey (usually for sport), and dogs requiring vast farm land that displaces a coyote’s natural habitat. But Frances Anderson Center has solar panels and tax dollar subsidize electric cars for wealthy people. This town lectures constantly, and needs some leaders.




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