History

Looking Back: Reuben Hunter and an early-day mystery

Looking Back: Reuben Hunter and an early-day mystery

Over 70 years before there was a City of Lynnwood, and even before Alderwood Manor, a few pioneer families were living on land that is now part of Lynnwood. They were the homesteaders, and three of the most well-remembered family names were Hunter, Breed and Morrice. Without a doubt, the most interesting of these was the Hunter family: Duncan, a Scotsman; his wife Jennie; and their four sons, Will... »

Looking Back: 50 years ago — February 1965

Looking Back: 50 years ago — February 1965

Fifty years ago this month on Feb. 3, one of the major events taking place was the opening of Interstate 5 from Seattle to Everett. Two o’clock ceremonies at the Northeast 145th Street Interchange in Seattle included the U.S. color guard from Fort Lawton and the Queen Anne high school band. Following was an address by Gov. Dan Evans, and then Miss Rose Clare Menalo, a senior at Meadowdale High Sch... »

Go back to school with new exhibit at the Edmonds Historical Museum

Go back to school with new exhibit at the Edmonds Historical Museum

Remember the old schoolhouse desks where your seat was connected to the desk of the student behind you? How about when Edmonds High and Woodway High were two different schools? Ever attend a one-room schoolhouse? See and learn about all this and more at “Washington Schoolhouses,” the new exhibit at the Edmonds Historical Museum. Beginning with the mid-19th century roots of public education in Wash... »

Edmonds Museum storage is history — can you help?

The Edmonds Historical Museum and the Edmonds-South Snohomish County Historical Society need your help! Thanks to generous donations from citizens and businesses over the years, the Society has added many family treasures and community artifacts to the Museum collection. While some of these are on permanent display, most are kept in storage and brought out for special exhibits like the recent R... »

Looking Back: A joining of the past and the electronic age

Looking Back: A joining of the past and the electronic age

For many people, microfilm and microfiche may appear too antiquated to even bother with anymore. Especially, since it may seem as if everything that is important from the past in the way of books and other written material has now been digitized and is available to all. However, if you are a historian, a writer, or working on a term paper, you have probably discovered that many of our old newspape... »

Looking Back: The 1870 federal census and yet another genealogy pitfall

Looking Back: The 1870 federal census and yet another genealogy pitfall

A very puzzling roadblock came to light with the 1870 decennial federal census when I was gathering information while writing the book Chirouse, I could find no listing for Tulalip in Snohomish County. At this same time, I was also researching the history of the pioneering Spithill family. I ran into the identical problem in both cases. None of these people were shown in the Snohomish County censu... »

Looking Back: Genealogy and booby traps

Looking Back: Genealogy and booby traps

In 1790 the first decennial United States federal census had its beginnings with a simple purpose—to count people. The main objective was to determine the number of representatives to Congress from each state. The framers of the Constitution did not have genealogy in mind when they called for the enumeration of residents of this new country. However, despite its original purpose the census has bec... »

2015 Historic Edmonds calendars now available

2015 Historic Edmonds calendars now available

The City of Edmonds Historic Preservation Commission is proud to announce the release of the 2015 Historic Edmonds Calendar. This high quality, 12-month calendar depicts important events, places, and people from Edmonds’ past and is free to the public while supplies last. The historic photographs were provided by the Edmonds Historical Museum. Calendar layout and graphics were created by And... »

Looking Back: My father Walter Deebach and WWI

Looking Back: My father Walter Deebach and WWI

While attending the very impressive Veterans Day ceremony held by Lynnwood Post 1040, Veterans of Foreign Wars, on Nov. 11, I could not help but remember my father and how much his service in the military during WWI had impacted his life. Within a few months of our move to Alderwood Manor in 1933, my father, Walter A. Deebach Sr., became the commander of Alderwood Manor Post 90 of the American Leg... »

A look back in Edmonds: Larry Strickland and terror at the Pentagon

A look back in Edmonds: Larry Strickland and terror at the Pentagon

The ending of WWI in 1918 held out the hope that it would be the war that would end all wars and lead to peace. On that note, in 1919 Armistice Day was established to be observed annually on the 11th day of November at the 11th hour; to coincide with the ending of the war. Since that time, 95 years ago, the world has instead become much more dangerous. Armistice Day is now known as Veterans Day in... »

Looking back in Edmonds: What happened to Edmonds’ former Veterans Memorial?

Looking back in Edmonds: What happened to Edmonds’ former Veterans Memorial?

A short time before he died last year, my brother Tom Deebach, a former Eagle Scout with Edmonds Boy Scout Troop 339, asked me if I knew what had happened to the flagpole and the veterans’ memorial plaque which the Boy Scouts had given to the City of Edmonds. His query brought back the memory of that gift to the city in 1948. Up until that time, the Edmonds seemed to have had no memorial to honor ... »

Looking Back in Edmonds: The Walking Lady — Martha Kraencke

Looking Back in Edmonds: The Walking Lady — Martha Kraencke

There is no doubt that each city has its colorful characters. However, you will have to go far to find one more intriguing than Martha Kraencke, the walking lady of Edmonds. Martha was not just different; she had an aura of mystery about her. You could tell she must have been beautiful in her young years, and she had the quality of having had riches and importance. So, what was she doing walking t... »

Scene in Edmonds: Scarecrows around town

Scene in Edmonds: Scarecrows around town

Artfully Edmonds columnist Emily Hill took her camera around Edmonds Thursday to catch a sample of the first batch of scarecrows entered in the Second Annual Edmonds Scarecrow Festival, sponsored by the Edmonds Museum. If you want to visit, the first group is located as follows: 1) Chanterelle Restaurant – 316 Main 2) City of Edmonds Public Works – 2105 72nd Ave 3) Insurance Services G... »

Edmonds Museum names new director

Edmonds Museum names new director

The Edmonds Historical Museum and the Edmonds-South Snohomish County Historical Society has named Dr. Peter Bojakowski as the new Museum Director. He takes the helm starting Wednesday, Oct. 1. “We were fortunate to have a fantastic group of applicants,” said Emily Scott, chair of the selection committee. “It was a tough choice, but Peter’s combination of skills and backgrou... »

Looking Back: Gertie Perrin’s Perrinville

Looking Back: Gertie Perrin’s Perrinville

When Carl Perrin returned to their comfortable home in downtown Edmonds and told his wife Gertie they had just become owners of a few acres of land a few miles northeast and they were moving. Gertie’s comeback to him was “If I am moving to the sticks, then I am starting me a town.” True or not—we will never know. Gertie was quite the story teller. However, one thing we can be sure of, Gertie did h... »

Reminder: Edmonds Church of God to celebrate centennial anniversary Aug. 22-24

Reminder: Edmonds Church of God to celebrate centennial anniversary Aug. 22-24

The Edmonds Church of God will be celebrating its centennial with a weekend of events Aug. 22-24. According to a church announcement, the Church of God movement — based in Anderson, Indiana — began in 1881. In the summer of 1914 at the “Tall Timbers” camp meeting in Edmonds (the campgrounds were located at the western foot of 196th Street Southwest at what is now Laurelhurst Park) a gr... »

Happy birthday, Edmonds!

Happy birthday, Edmonds!

It was August 1890. For months there had been talk of incorporating Edmonds as a town, and the time finally seemed ripe to make this happen. It was the culmination of 18 years of growth and development that had seen George Brackett’s logging camp grow into a full-fledged town. An election was called for Aug. 7, so that town residents could decide this issue and vote yes or no on incorporatio... »

Scene in Edmonds: Fond farewell to Tarin Erickson

Scene in Edmonds: Fond farewell to Tarin Erickson

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Tarin Erickson leaving her position as Edmonds Museum director

Tarin Erickson leaving her position as Edmonds Museum director

After three and half years on the job, Tarin Erickson, director of the Edmonds Historical Museum, has announced her resignation. She will be transitioning to a position in Seattle, where she will continue her career in museum and collections management with the U.S. National Park Service. “It’s been such a pleasure to work in Edmonds as museum director,” she said. “The city... »

New self-guided tour takes you through Edmonds ‘Stages of History’

New self-guided tour takes you through Edmonds ‘Stages of History’

Have you seen the new sculpted artistic metal plaques that have been cropping up in downtown Edmonds? The ones that look like theater stages? It’s all part of the “Stages of History” walking tour, the newest addition to the Edmonds Arts Commission’s ongoing Fourth Avenue Cultural Corridor project, and it’s a great way to learn about local history yourself and one more... »

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