Artfully Edmonds: Change is in the wind

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Juliet Brewster
Juliet Brewster

On Wednesday night this week, the Community Cultural Advising Team met for the first time to discuss goals for the next six years of Edmonds arts culture. The team, selected by Arts Commissioner Frances Chapin, consists of 20 people from all different aspects of our artistic and cultural community. I was asked to join the team not only because of my role in writing this column, but also to share of my unique perspective as a member of the younger generation. The Cultural Plan will be made in conjunction with a six-year plan concerning the use of parks and open spaces in the city. There is a similar committee giving input on the parks side of things, and it also held its first meeting Wednesday night, with the intention of overlapping with the arts committee for a brief social hour.

Both teams’ meetings were facilitated by members of the MIG Planning team that the City of Edmonds hired to help us figure out this six-year plan. MIG Principal Lauren Schmitt and her assistant, Ryan, kept the conversation on track while we discussed what Edmonds is, what we want to be, and how to get there.

MIG, which does not appear to stand for anything, is a planning and design firm that was founded in Berkeley, Calif. in 1982 with the purpose of creating sustainable environments that support human development. In order to find the best solution to suit Edmonds, MIG is trying to get a holistic picture of the problem by talking with stakeholders and consumers of the arts and parks. The Arts Summit back in June was the firm’s first focus group, and in our discussion on Wednesday, they brought up many of the ideas that recurred during the Summit. There will be an online survey open to the public for anyone who would like to have their word heard in this ongoing conversation about how to improve the arts in Edmonds, which I will be sure to post a link to as soon as it comes out.

Gallery North is moving! As of Sept. 1, Gallery North will have taken over the old Semantics Gallery space at 401 Main St., including a portion of the backyard courtyard. Though the gallery, which has held its location at 508 Main St. for years, was booted somewhat unceremoniously by their landlord in order to make space for the rumored Starbucks expansion, they are very much looking forward to the move and see wonderful opportunities ahead in their new building. Delores Haugland said that the new space has much higher ceilings, better light and a more traditional floor plan with rooms in the back for classes. While members of the gallery co-op seemed certain that Starbucks is planning to expand into the space, the baristas working at Starbucks Thursday evening said that they weren’t supposed to know anything about it. Sounds like the big boy on the block is keeping his secrets secret for now, but I’m sure we will all be clued in soon enough. Muralist Joel Patience was in the gallery while I was speaking with Delores, and said that he is thrilled that his “Edmonds to Starboard” mural from 2011 will soon be on the outside of his favorite gallery in town. The gallery will keep their same phone number and hours. The first show in the new space is set to open in September, featuring work by the Seattle chapter of the Colored Pencil Society of America, with a reception and housewarming party on Sept. 15.

Jeff Evans
Jeff Evans

The last five performances of the Edmonds Arts Commission concert series are upon us! Next Tuesday at noon, Jeff Evans will be performing magic before our very eyes in Hazel Miller Plaza (5th & Maple).

Scott Lindenmuth
Scott Lindenmuth

Scott Lindenmuth, guitar teacher to the stars (including members of Nirvana, Soundgarden, and Metallica), and genre-crossing virtuoso, will put on an eclectic show Thursday evening in the Hazel Miller Plaza.

Sunday is the last summer concert in City Park, with The Weavils! Drawing inspiration from all kinds of dance-able folk music, from Celtic bluegrass to Hawaiian luau tunes, the Seattle-based Weavils are fun for the whole family.

Toy Box Trio
Toy-Box Trio

And on Tuesday, the 27th, see the spectacle of the toy-piano/double bass/accordion Toy-Box Trio when they bring their “neo-cabaret” aesthetic to Hazel Miller Plaza at noon. Infusing their carnival-classical compositions with jokes and factoids, Toy-Box Trio will fascinate even the rowdiest back-to-school protesters.

Finally, Alma y Azúcar will close out our summer with one last happy hour concert in Hazel Miller Plaza on Thursday evening, the 29th. Salsa with a modern affect played on a violin, trumpet, and tres—a traditional Cuban guitar.

Get tickets in advance for C’est la Vie’s fashion show to support DAWN (Domestic Abuse Women’s Network). The fashion show is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 26. Tickets are $20 a person for the night of food, drink and high fashion for a good cause! All proceeds from ticket sales and the raffle, plus a portion of the evening’s sales, will go to support women suffering domestic abuse and its consequences. Everyone leaves with a SWAG bag and inspiration for a new fall wardrobe. E-mail [email protected] to reserve your seat. On a side note: From now through the end of their summer season, C’est la Vie has all sale items marked down 50-60 percent.

s Morrie Morgan of The Whistling Season back to Butte, Montana in the winter of 1920, where a decadent mansion bestowed to him threatens to become a burdensome money pit.[/caption]

Ivan Doig’s upcoming novel, "Sweet Thunder," follows Morrie Morgan of The Whistling Season back to Butte, Montana in the winter of 1920, where a decadent mansion bestowed to him threatens to become a burdensome money pit.
Ivan Doig’s upcoming novel, “Sweet Thunder,” follows Morrie Morgan of The Whistling Season back to Butte, Montana in the winter of 1920, where a decadent mansion bestowed to him threatens to become a burdensome money pit.

Reserve your copy of Ivan Doig’s new book, “Sweet Thunder,” to be released Aug. 20! Doig is kicking off his book tour right here in Edmonds. He will be signing books at the Edmonds Bookshop on Saturday, Aug. 24. Stop in the Edmonds Bookshop to reserve your copy now—and don’t worry, if you can’t make the signing, just pre-pay for a personal inscription in your copy, to be picked up at your leisure. This is a wonderful chance to shake the hand of a nationally acclaimed writer living in our own backyard.

— By Juliet Brewster

Artfully Edmonds columnist Juliet Brewster, an Edmonds native and Edmonds-Woodway High School graduate, has a degree in literature from Bennington College. To have your arts happening listed, email her at [email protected].

2 Replies to “Artfully Edmonds: Change is in the wind”

  1. The Smilin’ Scandinavians, a fabulous group not to be missed, will be performing this Sunday, Aug. 18, at City Park. You mention that Sunday is the last concert in City Park, with The Weavels performing. They are scheduled to perform at the last concert on Sunday, Aug. 25.

    Ignored

  2. RE: Community Cultural Advising Team

    MIG appears to stand for a large company in California, Moore Iacofano Gottsman Incorporated….related to transportation issues….. Correct me if I’m wrong. What does “stakeholders” mean? In otherwords, who are they? Is this more about development mostly? If this is true, seems an odd way to “improve” the arts/culture in Edmonds. I would think whoever got this “MIG” on board knows what it stands for. I would think the City Of Edmonds knows what “MIG” stands for.

    Being an artist and very excited about the culture/arts of Edmonds and hoping this isn’t really about development, because when one thinks about ART/CULTURE, one doesn’t usually jump to the term “development”. It appears to me that MIG being really Moore Iacofano Gottsman Incorporated is about development. Perhaps someone at the City of Edmonds could explain.

    ***The “expertise” that MIG (Moore Iacofano Gottsman Incorporated) lists is the following:

    “Transit Oriented Development, Transportation, Mixed Use Development, Facility Planning, Economic Development, Conflict Resolution, Campus Planning, and other things, with no mention of ART or CULTURE in regards to ANY of their expertise.

    Ignored

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