Scene in Edmonds: A reminder of where Puget Sound starts — here

Members of the City of Edmonds Public Works Storm Division display a new street banner that promotes the regional partnership the City has with the Puget Sound Starts Here organization.  The banner is a reminder that over 7,000 storm drains in the City carry rainwater directly to Puget Sound and that the drains are not to be viewed as any kind of dumping spot, but only used for the flow of rain and the occasional snowmelt. The colorful banner will be taking turns hanging at different locations around the City. The vactor truck behind the crew is used by the crew to clean and maintain the storm drain system so it continues to be free-flowing.  At this time of year, the crew appreciates those residents that help them out by keeping storm drains clear of fallen leaves that collect on top of drains, an easy way to avoid flooding.  Residents that have any issues with storm drains, especially flooding, are encouraged to call Edmonds Public Works at 425-771-0235.
Members of the City of Edmonds Public Works Storm Division display a new street banner that promotes the regional partnership the City has with the Puget Sound Starts Here organization. The banner is a reminder that over 7,000 storm drains in the City carry rainwater directly to Puget Sound and that the drains are not to be viewed as any kind of dumping spot, but only used for the flow of rain and the occasional snow melt. The colorful banner will be taking turns hanging at different locations around the City. The vactor truck behind the crew is used by the crew to clean and maintain the storm drain system so it continues to be free-flowing. At this time of year, the crew appreciates those residents that help them out by keeping storm drains clear of fallen leaves that collect on top of drains, an easy way to avoid flooding. Residents that have any issues with storm drains, especially flooding, are encouraged to call Edmonds Public Works at 425-771-0235.
  1. Should a similar, perhaps smaller banner be prepared to promote the partnership the City apparently thinks it has with the Breske family? The Breskes are owners of a single family residential lot that the City continues to require serve as a stormwater repository for property in the vicinity of the Breske’s PRIVATE lot.

    If the property purchased by the Breskes was supposed to serve a PUBLIC purpose, why was it left in private hands when the related plat was approved in 1961?

    Snohomish County real estate tax records indicate that the value of the Breske’s Lot was historically assessed at a de minimus $1,000 level. The County suddenly revised the assessed value upward to $200,000 shortly before the Breske’s purchased the property in January of 2007. Knowing the property’s history, would the County have done so without first verifying that the reason for the de minimus $1,000 level no longer existed?

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