Go back to school with new exhibit at the Edmonds Historical Museum

The first school in Edmonds opened in 1884 in George Brackett's feed barn; six students were enrolled.  By 1887 the student population had grown to 15, and the school moved into this one-room schoolhouse located between 3rd & 4th Avenues just north of Main Street.  This 1887 photo shows teacher Miss Taylor and the original 15 students: Maybell White, Fannie Brackett, Ethel Smith, Zetta Fourtner, Flora Deiner, Ruth Hyner , Annie Deiner, Nellie Brackett, Oscar Deiner, Ralph McAlpine, Harry Deiner, George Brackett Jr., Frank E. Deiner, Fred Fourtner, Allen Smith.
The first school in Edmonds opened in 1884 in George Brackett’s feed barn; six students were enrolled. By 1887 the student population had grown to 15, and the school moved into this one-room schoolhouse located between 3rd & 4th Avenues just north of Main Street. This 1887 photo shows teacher Miss Taylor and the original 15 students: Maybell White, Fannie Brackett, Ethel Smith, Zetta Fourtner, Flora Deiner, Ruth Hyner , Annie Deiner, Nellie Brackett, Oscar Deiner, Ralph McAlpine, Harry Deiner, George Brackett Jr., Frank E. Deiner, Fred Fourtner, Allen Smith.

Remember the old schoolhouse desks where your seat was connected to the desk of the student behind you? How about when Edmonds High and Woodway High were two different schools? Ever attend a one-room schoolhouse?

The exhibit contains many classroom artifacts such as these old schoolroom desks with the attached benches.
The exhibit contains many classroom artifacts such as these old schoolroom desks with the attached benches.

See and learn about all this and more at “Washington Schoolhouses,” the new exhibit at the Edmonds Historical Museum. Beginning with the mid-19th century roots of public education in Washington, the exhibit features an extensive collection of photographs, artifacts, and oral history related to our schools. Special interpretive displays from the Washington State Historical Society highlight this state’s pioneering role in making quality education available to all. Through these displays, visitors will learn how the landmark Barefoot Schoolboy Law of 1895 established Washington State as an early leader in funding public education, setting us on the road to become a place where every child has equal opportunity and access to education.

“Washington Schoolhouses” opened on Saturday, Jan. 31 and will continue until Sunday, April 12, 2015

For more information or to arrange for special group or school tours, contact the Museum at 425-774-0900 or send an email to edmondsmuseum118@gmail.com.

The Museum is located in Edmonds’ historic 1910 Carnegie Library at 118 5th Ave. N. It is open year-round between 1 and 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday, but opens early on spring and summer Farmers Market days. Suggested donation in lieu of an admission fee is $5 for adults, and $2 for students.

Learn more at the Museum’s website.

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Visitors to the exhibit will see this photo of the Edmonds High School’s first football team. This photo inspired a local resident to make an original Edmonds High replica team sweater, which will be on display with the photo.

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