Historic Schumacher Building to join Edmonds Register of Historic Places

Early 1900s view of W. H. Schumacher Groceries on Main Street, Edmonds. (Sno-Isle Libraries Digital Collection; Edmonds Historical Society & Museum)
Early 1900s view of W. H. Schumacher Groceries on Main Street, Edmonds. (Sno-Isle Libraries Digital Collection; Edmonds Historical Society & Museum)

The Edmonds Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) as announced the newest addition to the Edmonds Register of Historic Places: the Schumacher Building at 316 Main Street, which now houses Chanterelle bistro.

A plaque ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. June 2 outside of Chanterelle, with Edmonds Mayor David Earling, HPC commissioners, and local business owners participating in the official unveiling.

The Schumacher building is one of the oldest commercial buildings in Edmonds and was built in 1890, the same year that Edmonds was incorporated. This building has housed local commercial enterprises for 125 years in the heart of downtown Edmonds.

William Schumacher
William Schumacher

Built by William A. Schumacher, the building has an interesting Western False Front façade and parapet.

According to an Historic Preservation Commission news release:

Schumacher was an enterprising businessman and citizen of early Edmonds. Amongst his many pursuits include being the City Treasurer, founding the Edmonds Bank, and briefly publishing the Edmonds Tribune newspaper. Schumacher left Edmonds in 1913 and moved to Sequim. In Sequim, Schumacher continued his active citizenry and became city clerk, then mayor, then town treasurer. William Schumacher died in Sequim on April 17, 1931.

The Schumacher building has been owned for several decades by the Blatt family and is currently home to one of Edmonds’ most popular hometown bistros: Chanterelle. Chanterelle has been owned and operated by Randy and Brooke Baker since 1997. The Schumacher building has been a visible gem throughout Edmonds’ history and has been artistically reproduced and captured by several artists, including Andy Eccleshall and Thomas Olsen.

The Edmonds Historic Preservation Commission promotes historic preservation and encourages owners of historically significant properties to voluntarily add them to the Edmonds Register of Historic Places in order to raise awareness and appreciation of local history. The commission meets every second Thursday of each month at 5:30 p.m. on the third floor of City Hall. The public is welcome to attend the meetings.

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