Driver cited for failure to yield after striking pedestrian Friday night

EPDpatchEdmonds police have cited a 52-year-old Edmonds driver for failing to yield to a pedestrian in a crosswalk following an incident at the intersection of 220th Street Southwest and 100th Avenue West Friday, Dec. 2 that injured a 69-year-old Edmonds pedestrian.

According to Edmonds police spokesman Sgt. Josh McClure, the pedestrian, who was crossing legally in the crosswalk when he was struck, was released from Harborview Medical Center Saturday after being treated for a broken arm plus lacerations and scrapes to his face and body.

The pedestrian, who was wearing dark clothing, was crossing 220th Street Southwest along 100th Avenue West around 8:40 p.m. Friday when he was struck by a Ford Ranger pickup truck — which making a left turn eastbound onto 220th Street from 100th Avenue West.

Edmonds traffic detectives concluded that “there was no evidence to support that the driver was impaired,” McClure said, adding that “he was cooperative throughout the entire process.” The investigation also showed “no excessive speed, recklessness, negligence on the part of the driver,” McClure added.

Noting the dark and rainy conditions at the time of the incident, McClure said that walkers should consider wearing reflective clothing — such as a safety vest — while walking after dark, and that drivers should be vigilant for pedestrians.

The failure to yield citation is a civil penalty that carries a $187 fine.

  1. Instead of blaming the victim for their clothing color—which was not illegal or mandated in any way by law—how about we put the rightful blame on the driver of the vehicle and give tips to prevent other drivers from hitting pedestrians?

  2. Not illegal doesn’t equal common sense. They’re not blaming the victim, just saying what’s obvious to most people: walking in the street while wearing dark clothing, at night, while it’s raining, isn’t very smart. And blame was put on the driver, in the form of a citation.

  3. I frequently visit my extended family who live in Vancouver, B.C. and have noticed how many pedestrians and bicyclists are present throughout that city. The bicyclists often wear reflective clothing so as not to be hit. Obviously pedestrians are not so likely to be thoughtful about their clothing, and my aunt and I have observed that most everyone in Vancouver seems to wear black. We often have come close to hitting a pedestrian who has simply stepped out in front of our car, not quite at the intersection, after dark, often in rainy conditions! It is horrible to have these close calls. I have rarely experienced this in Edmonds, but I am constantly watching for this situation because of how often it occurs for me in the big city of Vancouver. Yes, the blame should be on the driver but let’s all–drivers and pedestrians–try to be aware of this potential danger.

  4. “The pedestrian, who was wearing dark clothing, was crossing 100th Avenue West around 8:40 p.m. Friday when he was struck by a Ford Ranger pickup truck — which making a left turn eastbound onto 220th Street from 100th Avenue West.”

    From that description, either the pedestrian was crossing the street against the light or the driver ran a red light while making his left turn.

    1. Turns out there was an error in description of pedestrian’s direction of travel. That paragraph should read as follows (and has now been corrected in the story): The pedestrian, who was wearing dark clothing, was crossing 220th Street Southwest along 100th Avenue West around 8:40 p.m. Friday when he was struck by a Ford Ranger pickup truck — which making a left turn eastbound onto 220th Street from 100th Avenue West.

  5. Gosh, I could argue in both directions. But, no matter who is at fault, wearing dark clothing at night, especially in the rain, is taking a chance. I would not want to rely on being “in the right” when crossing in a crosswalk or any place else. To bring up other situations, people walk out from between parked cars (even in daylight) and I have often had to slam on my brakes. All of us, Drivers and Pedestrians, have to be alert for the unexpected.

  6. It is amazing how many folks are walking at night wearing dark colored clothing. We seem to have more pedestrians out there too, and for many reasons (some don’t own cars or simply are enjoying a walk in the outdoors). Quite a few seem to be paying little attention or even thinking about their surroundings.

    I was brought up in the old days to “look both ways before you cross the street!” Not many folks take time to even look anymore. Drive through the Winco parking lot if you don’t believe this. Furthermore, they are texting, on the phone or listening to music while oblivious to their surroundings. Walk signs at crosswalks are merely a suggestion sometimes.

    Granted, pedestrians generally have the right of way, but why risk it?

    On the other hand, we have drivers distracted for the exact same reasons – cell phones, texting, impaired by drugs and/or alcohol, daydreaming or simply not paying attention.

    Bottom line – drive defensively and walk defensively.

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