Seattle Times: Trump budget would cut nearly $1.2 billion for Lynnwood Link light rail

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A map of the Lynnwood Link project. (Image courtesy Sound Transit)

Sound Transit could lose nearly $1.2 billion in federal funding for the Lynnwood Link light rail project under President Donald Trump’s proposed budget, according to our online news partner The Seattle Times. That number is about half of the project’s total cost.

For the second consecutive year, Trump’s proposed budget would eliminate federal funding for future transit lines throughout Washington state, from Seattle’s downtown streetcar, to light rail between Northgate and Lynnwood, to a six-mile bus line in Spokane, the Times reported Tuesday.

Both Trump’s budget and his infrastructure plan face very long odds of becoming law. While Trump asked for similar cuts to transit programs last year, the bipartisan budget agreement reached last week bears little resemblance to Trump’s proposal.

Some estimates said the infrastructure cuts in Trump’s proposed budget were as large or larger as the new spending he proposed.

To read more about how Trump’s proposed budget will affect projects in Washington, click here for the full story from The Seattle Times.

11 Replies to “Seattle Times: Trump budget would cut nearly $1.2 billion for Lynnwood Link light rail”

    1. I believe in it. So do a lot of people. And I don’t think I qualify as a bum or homeless – nor do my engineering friends who use it regularly.

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  1. Gosh, Joy. I do respect your right to have an opinion, and there are many arguments both pro and con for light rail–I could argue both sides. The last sentence takes me aback. I have taken light rail–and I am not a bum or homeless.

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  2. So disappointing to see this report. And made worse by the fact that Snohomish County has already paid in about a $1,000,000,000 in taxes to get light rail up to Lynnwood.

    And Dorothy, totally agree with your comment.

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  3. This is the second year in a row that Trump has tried to do this. The Light Rail is a great way to get from the U District to downtown and from there down to the airport. I know plenty of people who take the light rail to/from the airport and they are not bums or homeless. They are just looking to save money by not having to pay for parking at the airport.

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    1. Paying 10 per day out of pocket for a parking spot is a deal compared to the year-round taxes that pay for Sound Transit. I agree that a large city needs light rail. That’s why DC and New York built subways. But above ground light rail is a folly. Our current bus and train systems are completely empty 3/4ths of the day and jam packed during peak hours. Get rid of buses and trains, allow Uber to run curb-side mini-shuttles that can throttle based on demand. It’s a pennies on the dollar solution that delivers better service while costing taxpayers nothing.

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      1. Let’s see, let me do the quick math on that: $10 a day for parking in a five day work week = $50/week. There’s typically 4 weeks in a month, so that’s $200 per month, which in a year would = $2,400.

        So you’re saying that the average person would pay more than $2,400 a year in taxes for Sound Transit??? Where in the world did you get that number?

        And the buses and trains are not 3/4ths empty most of the day. In all fairness, there is about a 4-5 hour midday lull, but they are still pretty full. Source: I am a daily commuter who uses public transit at various times of the day.

        Lastly, Uber does not provide shuttle service. Uber is comprised of drivers-for-hire using their own personal vehicles. Are you maybe confusing Uber with another transporation company? And it cost about $15 or so to go from downtown Seattle to Edmonds/Lynnwood using Uber, so again- not sure how you came up with your math as that would be about $30 a day using that service.

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  4. Matthew makes a good point about new technologies that can be part of the answer. Light rail costs a lot of money per passenger mile and projections show we will not reduce congestion. Using self driving vans, cars or passenger modules all of which can be shared would reduce the investment needed to move people. Just investing in technologies that would move people to the current light rail stations planned as far north as Lynnwood would increase the use of light rail while eliminating to add beyond Lynnwood on the north. Using these new technologies to better use the road system we have would go a long way to moving people and reducing congestion.

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    1. De-zoning, allowing commercial and residential spaces to evolve more organically, is the only congestion and density solution I am aware of. Ridesharing is a disruptive technology because it’s so effective.

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