Police: Family dispute appears to be cause of fatal shooting outside Arnie’s Saturday

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    Edmonds police said that a fatal shooting at Arnie’s Restaurant parking lot on the Edmonds waterfront late Saturday morning was the result of an apparent family dispute.

    Edmonds police spokesman Sgt. Josh McClure said that police were called to the restaurant at 11:43 a.m. after a Seattle man, 56, allegedly shot his sister, in her 40s, in the restaurant parking lot. The man then turned the gun on himself, police said.

    The man was dead when first responders arrived. The woman, who is thought to be from Fall City, was shot in the back or torso. She was treated at the scene and then transported to Harborview Medical Center, where she is in stable condition.

    According to McClure, witnesses said the man approached his sister at her vehicle in Arnie’s parking lot and shot her. “Seconds after he shot her, he turned the gun on himself,” McClure said. The woman’s husband and young son were in the car but were uninjured.

    It appears the victim and shooter were at Arnie’s for a family gathering, but it’s unclear whether they were entering or leaving the restaurant at the time of the shooting.

    The Snohomish County Medical Examiner will take custody of the body and determine official cause and manner of death, McClure said. One weapon, a shotgun, was recovered at the scene.

    Two Edmonds police detectives are with the victim, her husband and son — estimated to be 10 to 12 years old — at Harborview, McClure said. Another Edmonds detective is at the shooting scene.

    McClure stressed that the incident was in no way connected to the recent shooting during a party at the Edmonds Senior Center, which left a SeaTac man dead. Saturday’s incident “appears to be an act of domestic violence,’ McClure said. “There are no outstanding suspects and no danger to the community.”

    Arnie’s Restaurant is located at 300 Admiral Way.

    — By Teresa Wippel with reporting and photos by Larry Vogel

     

     

     

     

     

    29 Replies to “Police: Family dispute appears to be cause of fatal shooting outside Arnie’s Saturday”

    1. Holy cow, what is going on down there on the waterfront? I don’t remember ever hearing of a shooting down there, and now two within the space of a few weeks?

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    2. It seems we are regressing to the early wild west days of Edmonds–over 100 years ago. Not good to see history repeat itself.

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        1. You seem to imply that if everyone carried a gun we would be safer like they were back in the Wild West.
          To Quote the article.
          “Bank heists were a rarity (about eight bank robberies were recorded in the Wild West from 1859 to 1900) and most people didn’t carry around a loaded six-shooter. In fact, few people carried sidearms at all. Many western towns, such Dodge City, prohibited the carrying of firearms altogether.”
          The article seems to counter what you say.

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          1. Agreed. The question at hand is, does ubiquitous firearm ownership in a lawless society create violence? Patently, no. Most people had near immediate access to guns in the wild west. We’d all feel safer getting a drink at the OK Coral back then, than south side Chicago today.

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    3. This is so, so sad and echoes stories we see across the country on a daily basis. I’m concerned we may have reached a tipping point at which guns have become so ubiquitous in our country that the saying “the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun” may ring true. My hope is common sense gun regulations may reduce the potential for shootings such as those we have recently experienced in our community.

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      1. The answer to too many guns is NOT more guns. That’s known as escalation, and we’ve seen how well that worked with nuclear weapons. We need de-escalation. We need laws to keep guns out of the hands of those who should not have them. And because nobody buys something without intending to use it, we need to start asking those who own lethal weapons more in-depth questions about their intentions. In this country, our rights rest on a foundation of shared responsibility.

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      2. Council Member Teitzel,
        I fail to see how buying into the NRA-coined, profit-motivated “…a good guy with a gun” propaganda would have prevented any of these local tragedies. However, a securely stored firearm could have prevented the death of Gala Zuehlke. Many of us support the Council’s recent passing of the Safe Storage Ordinance- I hope to see our leaders continue this type of targeted, common-sense legislation and widespread education around gun violence prevention.

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        1. The rhetoric of the anti-gun left that more guns = more violence, is patently false. The statistical fact that surprises even those supporting the 2nd Amendment, is that Gun Violence, and the Gun Murder rate in particular since it’s peak in 1993; is down by nearly 50%. This despite the anti-gun Corporate media emphasis on mass shootings. That is indisputable statiscal Fact . This decline comes even as guns owned in America has soared during the period of the gun violence decline by 35%. That too is statiscally beyond question. Unfortunately, once again our mental health system failures have likely been exposed by this tragedy. I authored a published article recently that imcluded these very facts.

          https://en-volve.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/guns_per_person_vs._gun_homicide_rate_1993_to_2013_0.jpg

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      3. See my comments below. More guns is not the problem. Gun violence is also down by 50% the past 25 years. Our focus should be mental health related, that is the common denominator. Unfortunately, Congress 2 weeks ago in a Kumbaya lame-duck session with President Trump, watered down the very things that led to the reductions in violence, and gun violence/murders in particular. The President signed a reduction in Mandatory sentences for gun crimes, felons in possesion, and gun use during drug trafficking. Also, the Life sentences for 3 Strikes your Out. and the worst violent predators innsociety. The effective laws and policies promoted and passed by the NRA and it’s supporters over the past 25+ years, have been dilluted; we shall see the increased crime and violence as a result.

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    4. Violence of any kind generally just leads to more violence. The idea that Edmonds would/should somehow be exempt from this phenomena just boggles my mind. As long as we are a nation of people that loves small arms and the illusion that they some how keep us safe from each other and the evil and corrupt government that wants to control us, we will have escalating gun violence and violence in general. Not to blame guns entirely, I’m sure we would find other ways to be violent toward each other, if guns weren’t so readily available. My point is that, the only answer to all of this is an ancient one. ” Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” When you strike out in anger you risk being the recipient of anger in return. When you use people financially or sexually for your own pleasure, enrichment and satisfaction with no regard of their feelings and needs, you risk being the recipient of their anger and violence toward you in return. That’s just how it is, in Edmonds or anywhere else on the face of the Earth.

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      1. No one was making anti-gun arguments when a rare congregation of black people in Edmonds resulted in a homicide one block from here. No comments from council members or mayor. Even the Diversity Commision had no statement. Also, like I printed out, violence in all categories is near record lows. Nobody likes violence, but people prefer violence that fits their politics over violence that doesnt.

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    5. I’ll take your statement that man is less violent now than in the past as a fact, and that is a very good thing, if it is true. I do not agree that “nobody likes violence.” Movies, books, television, and video games in our society are full of depictions of violence, past, present and future. Violence always starts with one person trying to have domination over another in some form or other. The ultimate act of domination is the taking of another persons life for whatever reason and in whatever way. The method is irrelevant. Gun laws are irrelevant. A statement like “a rare congregation of black people in Edmonds resulted in a homicide one block from here” is strange at best and racist at worst. If it had been a rare congregation of “pink” people would there have been little or no chance of a homicide? You are insinuating that Black people are more violent than all other categories of people, my friend. Worse yet you are saying that Black people are rarely seen in our community and implying that they should not be allowed to “congregate” here.

      lence”. Our movies,

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      1. Clinton, why didn’t people make anti-gun arguments in the wake of the senior citizen center shooting? I’m being a bad lawyer, asking a question I already know the answer to. I think it’s the same reason nobody cared when an African Immigrant was beat up by a panhandlers on 4th of July. People care about this suicide-homicide though. I don’t think Edmonds activists and politicians really care about POC.

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        1. It’s not necessarily the circumstances of this particular shooting, but “the straw that broke the camel’s back” concept that is likely the reason there is more discussion of gun violence among this community at this particular time. It makes sense that the number of incidents in a short period of time would generate more concern and dialog. The vast majority of gun violence deaths in this state (nearly 70 percent) — and nationwide — are suicide. Every person working toward gun violence prevention is aware of this statistic and advocates for public education and policy that seeks to address it. Your comments are not productive, IMO.

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          1. Sue. The senior citizen center murder of a dad just wasn’t a big enough straw to break the camel’s back? Activists knew not to engage. You’d think the mayor, the council, the Diversity Committee would have asked people who know something to say something in that case (alleged murderers were released back into the community), before they’d make anti-2nd amendment arguments in this case. There’s a script being followed, and it’s at the expense of civil rights and at the expense of POC.

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    6. Good points! As someone who grew up with guns and used them in sport (Dad was a world record-holding gunsmith, brother was a 3-time NRA champion, I was with the US Biathlon Team) I am not, afraid of guns. I am afraid of poorly-trained people with guns. In my background safety was the alpha and omega, constantly practiced and preached. Despite that, there were still accidents (non involved injury, thank goodness). Guns are useful tools in some circumstances (I grew up on a ranch – we needed guns for predators, snakes… _), gun sports are challenging and good discipline. But a heavily-armed, poorly-trained populace is altogether another thing.

      I don’t have a solution. There isn’t One Grand Solution. But there are numerous steps that might be taken, and I hope we are not intimidated either into discussing them or taking the ones that are found to be sensible. At the moment, as in so much, there is more passion and hyperbole than useful conversation. Perhaps the first step is to calm down and listen? And then to respond courteously and in an informed and informative manner.

      I expect I’ll be attacked for saying even that much!

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    7. As far as I’m concerned, you are right on the money here. I was given a shotgun when I was 11 years old after two years of going hunting with the men; observing and making mental notes of how guns were handled safely in the field, in cars, storage etc. In Nebraska pheasant (bird) hunting was a rite of passage in the 50’s, particularly for people like me who grew up on or visiting farms of relatives. I’ve often thought that we should have fire arms education in our schools, similar to driving courses and other skill sets that are frequently taught to our young people. Some civics courses wouldn’t be a bad idea either, along with some ethics and human relations.

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    8. In western Europe, where I grew up, it takes a long time to purchase a pistol. The agency checks out your background and that of the people with whom you share a residence, as well as checking for mental illness. The long interval also allows for a “cooling-off period” so that no pistols that were just purchased will be used to murder somebody, at least not right away. I think this cooling-off is very important as well, given the nature of human emotions. Most people in Europe don’t own a weapon. Knives are used in violent crimes, but the majority of victims survive.

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    9. A sad family tragedy seems to now being used to promote “gun violence” debate. This seems premature at best insofar as we have no facts as to how and when the shotgun (not a pistol) used in this tragedy was obtained and/or if it was legally obtained. Mental health issues of the shooter would appear to be the likely cause of this shooting. Too bad we do not focus more attention and resources towards fixing our terrible public mental health system. Currently, involuntary treatment for the mentally ill can only happen if there is proof the person is an “imminent threat” to self or others. It should be changed to “probable threat” by the Legislature and Northern State Mental Hospital should be reopened with adequate funding.

      Guns, like cars, are tools that in the wrong hands can cause innocents to die. The CDC reports “Every day, 29 people in the United States die in motor vehicle crashes that involve an alcohol-impaired driver. This is one death every 50 minutes. The annual cost of alcohol-related crashes totals more than $44 billion.” Cars are not the problem; drunk impaired drivers are.

      In my view, public safety would be enhanced by better efforts to fix or isolate from society dangerous people who are mentally ill or just plain criminals. Reasonable gun laws (whatever that means) may be fine but, criminals and the mentally ill are not deterred by them.

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      1. Of course we need to address mental health issues as an integral part of suicide prevention and gun violence prevention. That does not, however, preclude the need to pass les that protect public health and safety. Your own argument reinforces that we need reasonable gun safety laws. Public education campaigns are an important first step, but we didn’t move the needle appreciably on preventing deaths due to drunk driving until we passed laws to enforce compliance. That doesn’t mean that laws have to be punitive, but they do need to enforce the idea that our rights rest on a foundation of shared responsibility. Guns are lethal weapons. Deflecting a discussion of that reality by focusing entirely on mental health issues as a solution to the problem of gun violence in our communities is disingenuous.

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      2. You are spot on. We need to focus on the true “trigger” not the tool. The common denominator is the mental state of the shooter. We must take more intervening action to get help for the ticking time bombs amongst us. We do them a disservice by not committing and treating them before they detonate in society, with horrendous consequences. Inhave authored many articles on our shared view and to that point.

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    10. I totally agree with Mark’s comments here. Access to long term mental health care in our society is almost totally lacking for all but the very wealthy. Much of the drug and alcohol abuse in our society stems from people using these substances to self medicate. Most of the “poor” and “out of work” people asking for money at our traffic intersections are looking for money to finance drug, alcohol and tobacco habits. They don’t “need” handouts, they “need” intervention, treatment and then homes and jobs. Our substitute for mental health treatment facilities are jails and prisons, often run for profit especially in the more politically conservative states. Drug abuse, gun violence, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect are all symptoms of a very sick society. We want to put band aids on the symptoms and skip the full blown and expensive surgery it will take to actually solve the problems. I’m sure this comment will solicit a bunch of political and racist garbage from the Edmond’s is special crowd but we are all entitled to our opinions and I respect that, if not the opinions per se.

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    11. I agree with you that mental healthcare, and mental illness is a huge part of the gun violence problem. More than 60 percent of Americans who die from guns, die by suicide, but that fact is often overlooked. Liberal Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee’s management of Western State Hospital and the State’s mental health system is not a “Point of Pride”. This has nothing to do with “Edmond’s is special crowd”,nor exclusive of either political side.

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