Edmonds again featured in Where to Retire magazine

For the second straight year, Edmonds has been selected as a top retirement destination by Where to Retire, a magazine geared toward helping people with retirement relocation decisions. Edmonds is profiled in a feature titled “8 Small Towns Near Large Cities” in the September/October 2019 issue.

Where to Retire Editor Annette Fuller said these eight cities offer the charm of small-town living plus access to big-city amenities. “With populations of around 100,000 or less, these towns provide plenty to do, but there’s also the hustle and bustle of a major metropolis for entertainment,” Fuller said. “Edmonds overlooks the Olympic Mountains and Puget Sound, and Main Street leads to the waterfront’s marina and beaches.”

According to the latest data from the U.S. Census Bureau, more than 700,000 Americans relocate to new towns in retirement each year. Generally, these relocating retirees are healthier, better educated and more affluent than those who choose to not relocate, and they bring significant economic benefits to their new states and hometowns.

Florida continues to reign as the No. 1 destination for retirement relocation, followed by Arizona, South Carolina and North Carolina. The most popular region is the Southeast, claiming eight of the 17 states showing increases in total net retiree migration. This research and the latest census data is detailed in Where to Retire’s four-part series on retirement relocation, with back issues available online.

6 Replies to “Edmonds again featured in Where to Retire magazine”

  1. Who wouldn’t want to live in “God’s Country”. The beach, the small town setting, the gorgeous sunsets and the cooler weather. I couldn’t ask for more!

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    1. Lovely Edmonds, however the city is trying to make us grow to collect more tax dollars. Also the city’s marketing is trying to get more visitors by encouraging them to ” come for the day.” I personally think we are populated enough. We might double our population in the next 20 years, I may not live that long.

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      1. Last I heard, Edmonds population is growing about one percent each year. At that rate, it will take maybe 65 years for population to double. With good planning, I believe we can manage a one percent growth rate and still preserve the great things we love about Edmonds.

        I’m a retiree from Seattle who moved to Edmonds, so I can’t be too hard on others who do the same. Part of the Edmonds charm is in welcoming newcomers to our community, and I’ve been made to feel most welcome indeed.

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  2. Just what we need; a magazine on retirement telling people to move to Edmonds to retire where life is good. How ’bout we all start keeping Edmonds “our little secret” and tell the rest of the world how tough we have it here; the winter rain and wind, a waterfront deathtrap, dogs running wild off leash, businesses in out of date buildings where you will be killed in the “big one” and, last but not least, no place to park. I recall when Oregon’s Governor once told Californians you are welcome to visit Oregon, just don’t move “here.” Maybe the next Mayor should adopt that approach.

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  3. Okay, Roger, you are officially grandfathered into our special little town and totally welcome, just don’t go telling all your friends about the joint. We don’t want the whole world trying to muscle in on a good thing you know.

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    1. I tell my friends if you can’t afford Seattle, you can’t afford Edmonds either. They should look a little further afield, maybe Enumclaw, places like that.

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