Trinity Lutheran Church to host Arab and Muslim Contributions lecture Sept. 19

Community members are invited to attend a free lecture, “Arab and Muslim Contributions: From Antiquity to Today,” Thursday, Sept. 19 at Trinity Lutheran Church, 6215 196th St. S.W., Lynnwood.

The lecture, from 7-9 p.m., will be led by David Fenner, an affiliate faculty member at the University of Washington’s Middle East Center. The evening is hosted by All for Peace, a group of Muslims and Christians “who share a mutual hope for greater understanding and unity in a divided and fearful world.”

Fenner has taught “Perspectives on Muslim Immigration in Europe” at the University of Washington’s Rome Center and currently leads study tours to the UAE, Qatar and Oman. He is also the lead presenter for the federally-funded Bridging Cultures program, a series of professional development workshops for K-12 teachers and first responders in communities with large immigrant populations. 

In 2008, Fenner founded the World Learning Center in Muscat, Oman. Prior to that he was the assistant vice provost for international education at the University of Washington. His career included establishing exchange programs with universities around the world, including in Egypt, Morocco, Israel, Uzbekistan, Turkey and Pakistan. 

For more information, visit the event Facebook page.

0 Replies to “Trinity Lutheran Church to host Arab and Muslim Contributions lecture Sept. 19”

  1. Arab and Muslim cultures are certainly full of amazing contributions thru history.
    Americans and Europeans certainly found it difficult to put their arms around most Germans during WW2. as Nazis were murderers. It really was up to Germans to stand up and take their country back. We may have Muslim friends, yet they need to stand up and put an end to extreme Muslims groups. Muslims to some extent need to assimilate when moving to France, the French do not need to change their culture to accommodate others. We certainly can find positives in most cultures. Today we worry that women do not find themselves back in a barbaric life.

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  2. ‘Americans and Europeans certainly found it difficult to put their arms around most Germans during WW2. as Nazis were murderers.’

    Not all Germans were Nazis, and many did try to effect change – but how to do that in the face of a murderous regime? And we must remember that thousands of German-Americans fought in the US army.

    ‘It really was up to Germans to stand up and take their country back. ‘

    How? In the end, of course, it was the allies who put an end to Nazism.

    ‘We may have Muslim friends, yet they need to stand up and put an end to extreme Muslims groups.’

    How are my Muslim neighbors supposed to do this? I’m afraid I just don’t quite get what you would have us and our Muslim friends do?

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  3. Many people seem to forget the contribution to the creation of the extremist groups Middle East by western, especially U.S. “regime change”

    from my perspective, “The Crusades” never ended, they just continue to change form

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  4. An e-mail from a friend who is deeply involved in Christian’Muslim-Jewish relations:

    Thanks so much for reaching out about this. It’s a hugely important question, and also a complicated one. More than having Muslim orgs refute this claim, a more important question is to ask, “Why are Muslim orgs and individuals expected to refute this claim?” To illustrate, after a Christian massacred people (in the name of Christianity) at Mother Emanuel in Charleston, why did no one say that Christians need to stand up and put an end to extremism? Or why does no one ask white men to stand up and put an end to extremism?

    What makes it even more complicated is that a growing body of research shows that when stereotypes are repeated, even in an effort to negate/refute them (e.g. “Not all Muslims are terrorists”), it actually backfires and just reinforces the stereotype in many people’s minds.

    That said, there are a lot of folks doing great work on this issue. Check out the “Allies” page at CAIR Washington, or ISPU. Also, Pastor Terry Kyllo runs an organization called Neighbors in Faith. He is a great ally in this work and is particularly interested in working outside of Seattle — and also working with media(terry@neighborsinfaith.org).

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