Inslee announces cap on third-party delivery fees to help restaurants

Gov. Jay Inslee Thursday announced a new cap on fees charged to restaurants by third-party delivery platforms, such as Uber Eats, DoorDash, GrubHub, Postmates and others.

“We recognize the challenges posed by COVID-19 to our restaurant community, and we’re grateful to third-party delivery platforms that have made it possible for Washingtonians to continue supporting local restaurants, and allowed many businesses to stay open,” Inslee said.

“However, these are difficult times. We all must sacrifice during these uniquely challenging times to both support our businesses and slow the spread of COVID-19. We encourage Washingtonians to support their local restaurants safely through delivery and take-out options that are available.”

The proclamation caps delivery fees at 15% and total fees at 18% of the purchase price of an order. Third party delivery platforms have seen increased usage as fewer people are dining indoors this year due to health restrictions and concerns over contracting COVID-19.

The proclamation is similar to measures taken in several cities around Washington. It takes effect Wednesday, Nov. 25, at 12:01 a.m.

21 Replies to “Inslee announces cap on third-party delivery fees to help restaurants”

  1. Ah yes, delivery! So much safer than take out. This way, someone else gets the virus for you! But it doesn’t matter, they are in the lower “essential worker” class. You are a member of the “work from home” class, and need to stay safe. Just make sure you put a giant virtue signal sign in your front yard, and thank the essential workers on facebook daily.

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  2. What business is it for Inslee to cap a service industry? Are we in a free business world or not? Remember the slogan what the market can bear? We have a lot more problems that outweigh him getting involved with what private businesses charge. None of his business. The delivery person has to make money too. What other business caps he thinks he should do? Covid is on the way out remember?

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  3. Where is our legislature? We are almost 10 months into this Covid-19 thing and have only the “ benefit” of the governor’s thinking. New laws are supposed to be discussed and debated by the house and senate and then passed to governor for his review, yet in 10 months of Covid-19 issues… nothing! Not a peep from the legislature. I assume the legislature is still being paid …but how “ essential” are they?

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  4. I don’t think it’s clear that having individuals from several households converging on a restaurant is safer than one delivery person serving several households.

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  5. If you would have told me that Democrats would be instituting a Maximum Wage (instead of a Minimum Wage) last year, I might not of believed you.

    Doesn’t this cap just make for fewer 3rd Party deliverers? No one would deliver for say 5%. Everyone would deliver for say 50%. This is an Econ 101 thing.

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  6. All I have to say is, if Loren Culp were “governor elect” we would be looking at a light at the end of this idiotic tunnel known as the Jay Inslee power trip. I am wondering how many Inslee voters out there are beginning to experience some serious “buyer’s remorse”? I have news for you. You gave us all 4 more years of the same and it is not going to improve and will likely get much worse.

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    1. I voted for Culp, but frankly the State Republicans have no one to blame but themselves for nominating someone completely unable to win the election, and looking at his behavior after he lost, someone not suited for office.

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      1. Culp was not the Republican Party’s candidate; they endorsed Joshua Freed in the primary. It was Washingtonians chose Culp to advance beyond the primary. Our state is a top-2 primary, meaning it could have been two democrats on the ballot in the general election, as it was for Lt. Governor.

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  7. I read the proclamation and I think it’s in good form and there’s nothing that stops the customer from slipping the driver a cash tip if you feel like you need to.

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    1. Don, I think you are making the mistake of overestimating the generosity of the average consumer. This is kind of like the argument that private charity is sufficient to replace government social programs.

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      1. Washington State averages out at around 14.08% for tipping, which is at the higher end for the nation.

        https://www.simple.com/blog/simple-insights-lets-talk-tipping

        Tipping is of course highly variable, and industry-specific (e.g. I have never tipped a cashier at the grocery store, or the CPA that does my taxes), but I would love to hear from people in our local food/bar service industries to learn what they think of local tipping. Whatever, I don’t think a government social program in place of “tipping” is warranted ..

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      2. Kashf you’re wrong, I make mistakes but that’s not one of them. I read the proclamation and agree with it for my own reasons. If some of us begin to feel bad for the drivers, we can give them a couple extra bucks. If you are struggling student maybe now is not your time to be so generous and that’s ok. Keep up with your studies and work hard then later in life you will have a couple extra bucks to share too. The private charity/social program argument is not one I would make.

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        1. Don, we don’t see the governor putting a maximum price for food on restaurants like Salt and Iron. We wouldn’t have to “feel bad” for kids driving food around if we just let them earn a fair wage. The only thing more regressive than a minimum wage is a maximum wage.

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  8. What am I missing? Capping the fee relating to delivery? Isn’t that the fee to get the product to the consumer. As a consumer am I then limited in any way on a tip? I don’t use these delivery services so really do not know if can can tip the delivery person or not. Is there language in the order to prevent me from tipping? Just trying to understand.

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  9. Matt you’re thinking too simple. Takeout food is available at different price points Salt&Iron is upper, SubWay is lower so Inslee doesn’t need to worry about that. Price inflation from delivery during this time of economic stress and food insecurity is not ideal for stressed families so our governor stepped in as authorized with a proclamation that spells this out. Fuel vouchers for the drivers would be a nice touch if he can even do that, or any other cool idea. We don’t need crappy discussions as much as we need cool ideas. If you order from Salt&Iron you might have an extra buck or two, pass it on to the driver.

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    1. Good ideas? Why can Salt and Iron charge what they want for steak and oysters but a driver can’t charge what they want to deliver it? This is regressive.

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      1. “Why can Salt and Iron charge what they want for steak and oysters but a driver can’t charge what they want to deliver it?”

        This is government business as usual in Olympia. The restaurant owners have better lobbyists than the drivers.

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  10. Interested citizens may want to be aware of an Emergency Ordinance scheduled for action on Tuesday Night, November 24th.

    City Staff is recommending that City Council adopt an Emergency Ordinance Providing the Mayor Temporary Authority to Use Tools to Address Economic Emergency.

    This appears to be very broad action. The following is part of the proposed Ordinance:

    The city council hereby suspends, on a temporary emergency basis, any portions of Titles 3 (Revenue and Finance), 4 (Licenses), 6 (Health and Sanitation), 8 (Traffic), 9 (Sidewalks), 17 (General Zoning Regulations), 18 (Public Works Requirements), 19 (Building Codes), and 20 (Review Criteria and Procedures) of the Edmonds City Code and Community Development Code that the administration deems necessary to suspend in order to respond to the economic emergency within the city, PROVIDED THAT the administration shall report to the city council on all such suspensions within thirty days of the suspension.

    and;

    The administration is hereby authorized to utilize, on a temporary emergency basis, any rights-of-way or other real estate owned by the city to respond to the economic emergency, PROVIDED THAT the administration shall report to the city council on all such uses within thirty days of authorizing such use.

    Whether one supports or opposes this Emergency Ordinance, please consider contacting City Council to let them know how you feel. The opportunity to do so is very limited as this is scheduled for action Tuesday Night, November 24th.

    On September 15, 2020, Mayor Mike Nelson said that an item on Council’s agenda (6.60) that evening wasn’t yet ready for council discussion. Chapter 6.60 deals with the City’s Disaster Preparation, Emergency Coordination, and Civil Emergencies. I wonder why Chapter 6.60 has not been brought back to Council and now this Emergency Ordinance is being brought to Council?

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