Reminder: Future of housing topic of Sept. 27 Edmonds Civic Roundtable virtual discussion

The Edmonds Civic Roundtable is inviting the public to participate in a free roundtable virtual session from 4-6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 27 regarding the future of housing in Edmonds.

The two-hour meeting will begin with presentations by people familiar with housing issues in the community, followed by a question-and-answer session, community member comments and suggestions, and a general discussion of housing issues.

Edmonds Civic Roundtable (ECR) said it will also capture and summarize the input and provide the information to City of Edmonds officials.

Speakers include Tom Mesaros, ECR board chair; Duane Leonard, executive director, Housing Authority of Snohomish County and Mike Rosen, ECR board member

Register at edmondscivicroundtable.org/erchousing. You will be sent a Zoom link in advance of the session.

 

7 Replies to “Reminder: Future of housing topic of Sept. 27 Edmonds Civic Roundtable virtual discussion”

  1. This sounds like a great event. One thing that occurred to me recently is that both Oregon and California have recently abolished single family zoning altogether.

    It is quite likely that Insley would do the same for Washington State, and get rid of all single family home designations.

    If that is the case, what rules and laws would Edmonds and Snohomish County have to ensure facility needs, traffic safety, parking, utility services, and other factors are being adequately met?

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  2. https://www.latimes.com/homeless-housing/story/2021-09-17/what-just-happened-with-single-family-zoning-in-california

    Of the housing measures that Newsom signed this week, only one — SB 9 — would have an immediate and direct effect on local zoning. Simply put, SB 9 would give many homeowners in single-family zones the right to divide their lots into two and build up to three additional homes on them, essentially turning a single-unit lot into a four-unit lot.

    I don’t believe CA abolished Single Family zoning, just changed owners ability to sub-divide more easily

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  3. Well I wonder who will win out… the developers who want to lift the height limits in Edmonds or the homeowners that will want to subdivide their properties. Both topics will be on repeat for the next 100 years.
    Edmonds is, for the most part, fully developed. Our focus as a town moving forward should be on making our city more beautiful. Our dollars and cents need to go into our parks and maintenance of our public properties.
    Keep Edmonds the way it is. Don’t change the zoning rules so people can profit. Invest in our town so people can enjoy it more.

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  4. Important to read the article about CA since it clarifies just what was approved there. There remain many restrictions about lot size and ownership that permit some increased density IF there is space for it. The CA law does not permit zero lot line strip townhouse developments like they have done in Seattle. The devil is always in the details.

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  5. The devil is also in the doors opened. Often, the initial changes are just a precursor. How easy is it to modify the initial step, without citizen input?

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    1. Partially true. The amendment process is the same and requires public input, but you are correct that once a new approach is possible or a door opened, it is hard to close it later. Unintended consequences are also a real threat so such changes need to be reviewed and discussed very carefully.

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