Sponsor spotlight: Year-end tax-cutting ideas

Here are moves you can make to reduce your taxable income. But the year is quickly coming to a close, so plan accordingly.

Tax loss harvesting. If you own stock outside a tax-deferred retirement plan, you can sell your under-performing stocks by Dec. 31 and use these losses to reduce any taxable capital gains. If your net capital losses exceed your gains, you can net up to $3,000 against other income such as wages. Losses over $3,000 can be used in future years.

Selling appreciated assets. Plan to sell appreciated assets in the tax year that helps you the most. While this strategy may be hard to accomplish this late in the year, it is still worthy of consideration. To do this, estimate your current year taxable income and compare it to next year’s projected income. Then sell the appreciated asset in the year that will yield the lowest tax. Remember to account for the 3.8% net investment income tax in your estimates.

Max out pre-tax retirement savings. The deadline to contribute to a 401(k) plan for a 2022 taxable income reduction is Dec. 31. So if your employer’s plan allows it, consider making a last-minute, lump-sum contribution. For 2022, you can contribute up to $20,500 to a 401(k), plus another $6,500 if you’re age 50 or older. Even better, you have until April 18, 2023, to contribute up to $6,000 into a traditional IRA. And as long as your income does not exceed phaseout limits, you can reduce your taxable income on your 2022 tax return.

Bunch deductions so you can itemize. If your personal deductions are near the following standard deduction amounts for 2022: $12,950 for singles, $19,400 for head of household, and $25,900 for married filing joint, consider bringing some of 2023’s spending into 2022 so you can itemize this year. For most, the easiest way is to do this is to make 2023’s planned charitable contributions before the end of 2022. You can also include gifts of appreciated stock where you get to deduct the fair market value without paying capital gains tax.

Review health spending accounts. If you participate in a Health Savings Account (HSA), try to maximize your annual contribution to reduce your taxable income. Remember, these funds allow you to pay for qualified health expenses with pre-tax dollars. More importantly, unlike Flexible Spending Accounts (FSA), you can carry over all unused funds into future years. If you do have an FSA, you can carry forward a maximum of $570 from 2022 into 2023. The deadline for contributing to your Health Savings Account (HSA) and still getting a deduction for the 2022 tax year is April 18, 2023. The maximum contribution for 2022 is $3,650 if single and $7,300 for married couples.

While the year is quickly coming to an end, there is still time to reduce your 2022 tax liability, but only if you act now.

— By Nancy J. Ekrem, CPA
Managing Shareholder
DME CPA Group PC
Certified Public Accountants & Business Consultants
nekrem@dmecpa.com

425-640-8660

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Real first and last names — as well as city of residence — are required for all commenters.
This is so we can verify your identity before approving your comment.

By commenting here you agree to abide by our Code of Conduct. Please read our code at the bottom of this page before commenting.