Bird Lore: Yellow-rumped Warbler

  A widespread and sometimes common songbird, the Yellow-rumped Warbler calls Edmonds home. During winter, this warbler prefers deciduous woods and thickets, gardens and beaches. During breeding season it nests in coniferous and mixed forests. It usually stays on the forest edge, avoiding dense, unbroken forest interiors. Except during breeding season, this is a highly…

Bird Lore: Northern Shoveler

The Northern Shoveler is a puddle duck that favors shallow lakes, freshwater marshes, and sloughs. It can be found in Washington throughout the year, more commonly breeding in Eastern Washington. In Edmonds, you might see the Northern Shoveler on the Point Edwards pond, the Pine Ridge pond, Chase Lake or Lake Ballinger. As with all…

Bird Lore: Bufflehead

The Bufflehead, one of North America‚Äôs smallest ducks, is a diver. It can be found in Western Washington year round, although in very small numbers in summer. This duck can be seen along the Edmonds waterfront and on freshwater ponds from mid-October to early May. Along the waterfront, it stays in the nearshore waters. Look…

Bird Lore: Purple Martin

The Purple Martin is the largest of the Western Hemisphere swallows that breed in North America. As a cavity nester, this swallow now needs artificial nests to survive and reproduce. It can be seen occasionally in summer over the waterfront and the marsh because a small population nests in wooden boxes attached to the Point…

Bird Lore: Golden-crowned Sparrow

The Golden-crowned Sparrow is a far west specialty of the U.S. and Canada. It is a common winter resident of the Puget Trough that can be found throughout Edmonds from autumn to late spring. Look for this sparrow in brushy areas of parks and yards. By the end of May, most of these sparrows will…

Bird Lore: Harlequin Duck

The Harlequin Duck is a sea duck that can be seen in small numbers along the Edmonds waterfront, typically from late fall to early spring. Although they are often seen just flying by, in the last couple of years, two to four birds have been seen often from Sunset Avenue. They are either swimming or…

Bird Lore: Pine Siskin

The Pine Siskin, a smaller, social member of the Finch family, can be seen everywhere in winter in Edmonds or not at all. It is well known as a common breeder of northern regions and mountain forests and even better known for its irruptive movements. It is a drab, streaked bird with a narrower, pointier…

Bird Lore: Barn Swallow

The flowing, graceful flight of the Barn Swallow, with its long forked tail, is a hallmark of summer. Many enjoy watching it feed over water and open areas. In summer the Barn Swallow is widespread across North America, Europe and Asia. It winters in South America and southern Africa. Look for it in Edmonds around…

Bird Lore: Mobbing and nest protection

Smaller birds will often mob birds of prey to protect themselves or their nests. Birds of prey are meat-eating predators such as hawks, falcons, eagles, owls, and shrikes. Even a single bird will chase a bird of prey away from its nest. In LeRoy’s first photo, taken last spring, one of the resident Bald Eagles…

Bird Lore: Red-tailed Hawk

A raptor perches high on a pole or tree, scanning the ground for prey. Only when it spots the vole does it spread its wings and swoop downward, talons outstretched, for the kill. This is the Red-tailed Hawk, a patient hunter that conserves its energy until dinner is served. It is a hawk of open…

Bird Lore: Barrow’s Goldeneye

Barrow’s Goldeneye, another diving duck of the genus Bucephala, can be seen in small numbers on the Edmonds waterfront in winter. Its world population is not as abundant nor as widespread as that of the Common Goldeneye. Barrow’s is found in northwest North America, with small populations also located in eastern Canada and Iceland. Both…

Bird Lore: Common Goldeneye

The Common Goldeneye is a circumpolar diving duck. Take a summer trip to Scandinavia or Russia and you may see this same species that you see on the Edmonds waterfront in winter. It is a duck that prefers forested lakes and rivers, but in winter it frequents salt water bays and sea coasts. The Common…

Bird Lore: Wood Duck

How can anyone dressed to the nines be so shy and retiring? If the Wood Duck drake could talk, perhaps he would explain himself. You can see in LeRoy’s first photo that the male shows off deeply saturated, multicolored plumage. He is difficult to miss when he is in the open. The hen’s plumage is…

Bird Lore: Hairy Woodpecker

Woodpeckers appeal to most of us, perhaps because we don’t see them often and they are distinctive. Even the most hard-core birder, accustomed to all sorts of birds, thrills at the sight of a woodpecker. We can laugh at the clownish looks of the Acorn Woodpecker, we can be wowed by the stunning red head…

Bird Lore: Hooded Merganser

The Hooded Merganser is a diving duck. It is the smallest of the three mergansers that are native to North America. It spends most of its time on freshwater ponds, lakes, and streams. In Edmonds this duck can be found around the marsh and Willow Creek, the Point Edwards pond, and perhaps on the ponds…

Bird Lore: Sanderling

The Sanderling is like an omni-directional wind-up toy on wheels. At least it seems that way when you watch one in winter, scurrying every which way on a sandy ocean beach, playing tag with the waves. Its legs blur as you watch its never-ending motion. Author Pete Dunne describes the behavior of this species: “Up…

Bird Lore: Northern Flicker

It’s spring. You are sitting quietly in your house, perhaps you are even sleeping early in the morning. A metallic, staccato drumming reverberates loudly through your house. It startles you such that you feel like you just slammed into your ceiling. A Northern Flicker is drumming on your gutters or your metal chimney to defend…

Bird Lore: Cackling Goose

Up until 2004 any goose with a gray or brown body, black neck, and a black head with white chin straps was called a Canada Goose. In that year the American Ornithological Union concluded that, because of genetic differences, there were really two species lumped into Canada Goose. Of the six or seven subspecies, the…

Bird Lore: Dark-eyed Junco

  In 1735 Carl Linnaeus proposed a system for organizing the world around us that is still used today. Have you heard the mnemonic “Did King Philip cry out, for gosh sakes!”? That helps recall the ranking of kingdoms, classes, orders, families, genera, and species. Birds are a class in the animal kingdom. With scientific…

Bird Lore: Gadwall

  The Gadwall is another one of the dabbling ducks of the genus Anas. The dabblers prefer shallow or calm waters, mostly eating vegetation and aquatic insects. Often they forage by upending themselves, heads submerged and tails up in the air. In Edmonds look for this species on quiet waters such as the marsh, the…

Bird Lore: Hermit Thrush

The thrush family, in addition to the American Robin, includes several more reclusive birds that have brown backs and spotted chests. The Hermit Thrush is the only one that remains in the U.S. in winter. A Hermit Thrush that winters in the Puget lowlands probably spent its summer in the Cascades or further north in…

Bird Lore: Spotted Towhee

The Spotted Towhee is a large, colorful sparrow with a long tail. It likes to sing from high perches but otherwise keeps a low profile in the understory or in brush. Depending on the population, this species ranges from resident to completely migratory. Our Puget Trough population is primarily resident. The Spotted Towhee is an…

Bird Lore: Bewick’s Wren

The Bewick’s Wren (pronounced like “Buick”) is a common wren, at lower elevations, of dry thickets and open woods of the western United States. (J.J. Audubon identified this wren in Louisiana in 1821 and named it for his friend Thomas Bewick, a British engraver.) In Edmonds you can find this wren around the marsh, along…

Bird Lore: Green-winged Teal

Some duck species forage for food by dabbling at the surface of water or by upending with their tails up and their heads submerged. These are called dabbling ducks and they all belong to a genus of the Latin name Anas. Think Gadwall, Mallard, Northern Shoveler or American Wigeon for example. The Green-winged Teal is…

Bird Lore: Pacific Loon

Loons regularly seen in winter on Washington’s marine waters are the Common Loon, the Red-throated Loon, and the Pacific Loon. The most commonly seen on the Edmonds waterfront is the Pacific Loon. Although this loon breeds across northern Canada to Hudson Bay and Baffin Island, it migrates to the Pacific Coast of North America to…